Find NHLBI Clinical Trials

Search selected NHLBI-supported clinical trials and observational studies by condition, location, or age group. You can also view the complete list of NHLBI-funded studies at ClinicalTrials.gov.

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Showing 1 - 10 out of 31 results
Recruiting
Wisconsin
Does your developing baby have a heart defect? Have you had a stillborn baby? This study tests a new technology to measure fetal heart activity and find possible problems early. These problems include fetal arrhythmia and conduction disorders such as Brugada syndrome. To participate in this study, you must be at least 18 years old and pregnant, and have one of five high-risk complications of pregnancy: a fetus with a major congenital heart defect, hydrops, or gastroschisis; a previous unexplained stillbirth; or twins who share a placenta. This study is located in Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Adult, Older Adult
Female
Recruiting
Tennessee
Have you been diagnosed with orthostatic intolerance? This study aims to find out how the body’s regulation of basic functions, such as heart rate and blood pressure, is altered in people who have orthostatic intolerance. This condition, which has an unknown cause, is characterized by a racing heartbeat, dizziness, lightheadedness, and other symptoms that occur when a person stands up. To participate in this study, you must be between 18 and 80 years old and have orthostatic intolerance. This study is located in Nashville, Tennessee.
Adult, Older Adult
Accepting Healthy Volunteers
Recruiting
Maryland
Do you or your child have dyslipidemia? This study is exploring how different diagnostic tests can help us understand how lipid disorders, including high blood cholesterol and high blood triglycerides, affect the body. Information from this study may help improve the way lipid disorders are diagnosed or treated in the future. Participants in this study must be at least 2 years old. The study is being conducted in Bethesda, Maryland.
All Ages
Recruiting
Texas
Are you an adult who is healthy or has problems with the level of cholesterol or other lipids in the blood? This study is gathering information on the risk factors for very high or very low levels of lipids, or fats, in the blood. Researchers will collect participants’ demographic information, medical history, and blood samples. To participate in this study, you must be at least 18 years old. This study takes place in Dallas, Texas.
Adult, Older Adult
Accepting Healthy Volunteers
Recruiting
Virginia
Health organizations recommend exercise in an intensity based manner to promote cardiovascular adaptation and prevent disease. Metformin is a common anti-diabetes medication that reduces future type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, the optimal dose of exercise to be combined with metformin for vascular health remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether combining high or low intensity exercise with metformin has the potential to outperform either exercise intensity alone on blood flow across the arterial tree as well as impact insulin action in individuals with metabolic syndrome.
Adult, Older Adult
Recruiting
Virginia
Do you have metabolic syndrome? This trial is testing whether low-intensity exercise or high-intensity exercise works best to lower the risk of heart and blood vessel diseases in people who have metabolic syndrome and are taking a medicine called metformin to treat high blood sugar levels. To participate in this study, you must be between 40 and 80 years old and diagnosed with metabolic syndrome but not type 2 diabetes. This study takes place in New Brunswick, New Jersey.
Adult, Older Adult
Recruiting
South Carolina
Do you or your child have overweight or obesity? This study aims to find effective ways to prevent and treat obesity and metabolic syndrome in African American communities. The study will test the effectiveness of a family-based comprehensive health and fitness programs involving community health workers. Participants must be 12 years old or older and African American and have overweight or obesity. This study takes place in Charleston, South Carolina.
All Ages
Recruiting
Texas
Does your child have higher triglyceride levels but normal cholesterol levels? This study is testing whether a protein supplement called carnitine can help prevent blood vessel stiffness in teenagers who have metabolic syndrome or other risk factors for heart and blood vessel diseases. Participants in this study must be between 13 and 19 years old and have moderate to high blood triglyceride levels but normal blood cholesterol levels. This study takes place in Houston, Texas.
Child, Adult
Recruiting
Illinois
The development of type II diabetes (T2D) is strongly associated with obesity and both are well-established risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Knowing that vascular dysfunction is an early event in the development of cardiovascular disease in obese diabetic (OB-T2D) patients, The investigators set their long-term goal to define molecular mechanisms of vascular dysfunction and corrective strategies that target these mechanisms such as physical activity and weight loss. The investigators recently discovered that human adipose tissues release extracellular vesicles (adiposomes) that are efficiently captured by endothelial cells. Adiposomes are known to carry bioactive cargos such as proteins and micro RNAs; however, their lipid content has not been studied nor has their ability to transfer their lipid cargo to endothelial cells. In the current application, the investigators propose to investigate the role of adiposomes in communicating the unhealthy milieu, mainly dysregulated lipids, to endothelial cells in OB-T2D subjects. On top of these lipid species that the investigators propose to be carried by adiposomes are glycosphingolipids (GSLs). These lipids originate from the glycosylation of ceramides, a chemical process that is upregulated in the presence of inflammation and high glucose levels. Preliminary findings showed that in endothelial cells, GSL-rich adiposomes disturb plasma membrane structure and subsequently induce endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, the investigators found that preconditioning endothelial cells with high shear stress (which is an exercise mimetic) protected endothelial cells from the detrimental effects induced by adiposomes. Therefore, the central hypothesis is that adipose tissues in OB-T2D patients release GSL-loaded adiposomes that induce vascular endothelial dysfunction. The researchers propose that exercise and weight loss interventions (bariatric surgery) will restore adipose tissue homeostasis, reduce GSL-loaded adiposomes, and subsequently alleviate vascular risk in OB-T2D patients. The investigators will test the hypotheses by pursuing the following aims: aim 1: Investigate the role of GSL-rich adiposomes in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction in OB-T2D adults; aim 2: Test the effectiveness of exercise training in reducing adiposome-mediated effects on vascular function; and aim 3: Examine changes in adiposome/caveolae axis following metabolic surgery and their association with vascular function.
Adult