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Showing 10 out of 2052 results
A woman sleeps soundly in a bed.
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News Release
Adults who cut back on sleep for six weeks had increased markers of inflammation Getting a consistent good night’s sleep supports normal production and programming of hematopoietic stem cells, a building block of the body’s innate immune system, according to a small National Institutes of Health-supported study in humans and mice. Sleep has long...
An older woman holds an inhaler
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News Release
About 20–40% of adults with COPD symptoms but who aren’t diagnosed with COPD use these types of long-lasting inhalers Researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health have found that dual bronchodilators – long-lasting inhalers that relax the airways and make it easier to breathe – do little to help people who do not have chronic...
A man uses a pulse oximeter device
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NHLBI in the Press
Researchers found pulse oximeters overestimated oxygen levels for adults who identify as Asian, Black, or Hispanic – which can lead to missed or delayed opportunities for COVID-19-related treatment and care.
Young woman lies in bed at night while looking at a cell phone.
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Research Feature
You’re ready for bed, so you turn off the lights and pull down the shades. Sure, a little light may stream from the sides of the window, or beam from your alarm clock, or TV modem, or cell phone. No big deal, you say? Think again. It turns out that even tiny amounts of nighttime light—from any source—may be harmful to your heart. One recent study...
A doctor looks at a tablet
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NHLBI in the Press
After assessing data from thousands of adults hospitalized for COVID-19, researchers found those who smoked or vaped were more likely than non-smokers to experience severe outcomes, including needing advanced respiratory support.
Computed tomography of the chest
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NHLBI in the Press
Differences in the structure and size of airways of women compared to men may help explain why women are more likely to experience worse COPD symptoms, according to research published in Radiology.