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NHLBI in the Press
An NHLBI-funded study found that obesity and other common cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, and smoking play a greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among younger people than previously recognized.
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NHLBI in the Press
Researchers funded by NHLBI found that buprenorphine, a Schedule III drug used to treat opioid addition, could cause breathing problems in some obese patients. The discovery of the drug’s previously unknown side effect could help clinicians improve patient care.
Lecture Series Logo: NHLBI 70 Years of Discovery
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Media Advisory
WHAT: The Framingham Heart Study , a joint project of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and Boston University, marks its 70th anniversary this year. Daniel Levy, M.D., director of the project , will deliver a special lecture to acknowledge the landmark, multigenerational study, which began in 1948. The topic of Dr. Levy’s talk w...
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NHLBI in the Press
A new NHLBI-funded study found that fats spur cells to divide quicker which causes tumors to grow up to 100 times faster. This could explain the long-known connection between dietary cholesterol and colon cancer, according to research published in the journal Cell Stem Cell.
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NHLBI in the Press
Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a destructive lung disease that primarily affects women and can lead to respiratory failure. While sirolimus is the treatment of choice for patients who have rapidly progressive LAM disease, some patients do not respond well to this drug.
photo of doctor reviewing lung scan
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News Release
Researchers have discovered that genetic variations in the anatomy of the lungs could serve as indicators to help identify people who have low, but stable, lung function early in life, and those who are particularly at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) because of a smoke-induced decline in lung function. The results of the study...
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Media Availability
After three decades of hopes tempered by setbacks, gene therapy—the process of treating a disease by modifying a person’s DNA—is no longer the future of medicine, but is part of the present-day clinical treatment toolkit. The Jan. 12 issue of the journal Science provides an in-depth and timely review of the key developments that have led to several...