News on Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders

Woman snoring in bed.
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Research Feature
For much of her life, Sarah Gorman, 71, battled a mysterious illness that left her tired, sleepless, and unable to concentrate. When her symptoms first started in her 20s, she turned to doctors for help. They diagnosed her with depression and referred her to a psychiatrist, but Gorman soon rejected that diagnosis because, she said, she simply did...
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News Release
Obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol more prevalent among irregular sleepers A new study has found that not sticking to a regular bedtime and wakeup schedule—and getting different amounts of sleep each night—can put a person at higher risk for obesity, high cholesterol , hypertension, high blood sugar and other metabolic disorders. In fact, for...
Asian man in bed suffering insomnia and sleep disorder thinking about his problem at night
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News Release
Researchers say they are closer to solving the mystery of how a good night’s sleep protects against heart disease. In studies using mice, they discovered a previously unknown mechanism between the brain, bone marrow, and blood vessels that appears to protect against the development of atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries—but only when...
African american man sleeping
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News Release
Treatment of sleep disorder might help improve blood pressure control in this high-risk group African-Americans with moderate or severe sleep apnea are twice as likely to have hard-to-control high blood pressure when their sleep apnea goes untreated, according to a new study funded mainly by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI),...
Illustration of woman sleeping
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Research Features
Feeling sleepy during the day? You’re not alone. Insufficient sleep is a common and fast-growing problem, with almost a third of U.S. adults reporting they get less than the recommended amount of shuteye. But while some people experience occasional restless nights that still allow them to be alert and productive during the day, many others...
Baby being examined with a stethescope.
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News Release
Children with sleep apnea syndrome who have their tonsils and adenoids removed sleep better, are less restless and impulsive, and report a generally better quality of life, finds a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health. However, the study found cognitive abilities did not improve compared with children who did not have surgery, and...