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Showing 10 out of 98 results
Blood Clot or thrombus blocking the red blood cells stream within an artery or a vein 3D rendering illustration.
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Media Availability
WHAT: After studying blood samples from 244 patients hospitalized for COVID-19, a group of researchers, including those who work at the National Institutes of Health, identified “rogue antibodies” that correlate with severe illness and may help explain mechanisms associated with severe blood clotting. The researchers found circulating...
Woman prepares to receive blood-pressure measurement with an arm-cuff monitor fitted by a health care provider.
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Research Feature
It’s a fact few can dispute: The COVID-19 pandemic has been devastating on Americans. It has caused high rates of death and illness, disrupted nearly every aspect of daily life, and been linked to increased heart disease, lung disease, obesity, and sleep problems. Now, NHLBI-funded researchers say the virus and related stress can also be blamed for...
Red Virus and blue DNA strand - medical 3D illustration with dark blue background
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Research Feature
NIH research continues to evaluate how blood thinners and anti-inflammatory medications may strengthen recovery at different points in the life of the virus W. Keith Hoots, M.D., director of the Division of Blood Disorders and Resources (DBDR) at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), shares insight into how treatments that break up...
Coronavirus or virus that circulates in the blood through the circulatory system in the human body to infect organs
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Research Feature
Severe blood clotting in patients has sent researchers in search of answers to optimize treatment and recovery As the virus that causes COVID-19 invades cells and replicates its code for infection, the body’s immune response fights back. However, for some people this can lead to extreme blood clotting – which can increase the risk for heart attack...
A doctor uses an iPad in a hospital setting.
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NHLBI in the Press
After reviewing the electronic health records of 72,147 patients with COVID-19, Cleveland Clinic researchers found those who had previously used a steroid-based nasal spray prior to infection were less likely to be hospitalized, receive intensive care, or die prematurely.