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3D illustration of a DNA helix surrounded by network connection lines
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Research Feature
NHLBI expands access to diverse genetic data, creating more possibilities for personalized medicine It was a big moment nearly four years ago when NHLBI’s Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine program (TOPMed) released nearly 9,000 whole genomes to a limited group of researchers. The genomes—complete sets of people’s DNA—were the first the program had...
woman scientist analyzing medication holding a syringe
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Media Advisory
Study shows treatment does no harm, but provides no benefit What A clinical trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of adults hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been stopped by the National Institutes of Health. A data and safety monitoring board (DSMB) met late Friday and...
An example of what the InCharge Health app would look like on a smartphone.
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Research Feature
A new smartphone app could be a boon for adolescents, young adults When the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the drug hydroxyurea to help reduce the excruciating pain suffered by people with sickle cell disease, the health care community was hopeful. The year was 1998, and the prospect of a drug that could offer significant relief from...
Image of senior African American man with nurse in background
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NHLBI in the Press
A recent analysis of data from African Americans found that those who smoke were nearly two and half times more likely to have a stroke compared to those who never smoked. But past smokers had a risk of stroke comparable to never smokers, according to published findings in the Journal of the America
African American nurse speaking with an african american patient in a wheelchair.
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News Release
Smoking cessation could be a path to fewer strokes, researchers say African Americans who smoke are nearly 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke than those who never smoked, while former smokers show a similarly lower risk as never smokers, according to a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings from the Jackson Heart...
An older lady with an oxygen tube in nose looking off into the distance
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News Release
According to a new study, people with small airways relative to the size of their lungs may have a lower breathing capacity and, consequently, an increased risk for COPD—even if they don’t smoke or have any other risk factors. The study, funded in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of...
A woman covering her face wearing facial medical blue mask,
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Research Feature
NHLBI-funded researchers tackle big questions with large study of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 The doctors on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic may be aware of the health impacts that face survivors of mass shootings or natural disasters, but the highly contagious virus—one of the deadliest in history—is forcing them to grapple...
Image shows SARS-CoV-2 (in red) infected ciliated cells in the COVID-19 patient's bronchi.
Credit: Takanori Asakura, Ph.D., University of North Carol...
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NHLBI in the Press
Researchers have characterized the specific ways in which SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, infects the nasal cavity, bronchia, and lungs.
Headshot of Dr. Richard Childs.
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Research Feature
In 2014 when the deadly Ebola virus was spreading like wildfire through parts of West Africa, Rear Admiral Richard Childs, M.D., led a team of physicians, nurses, engineers, and safety inspectors to Monrovia, Liberia to help treat the thousands of patients who had been infected. As the chief medical officer for the U.S. Public Health Service (USHPS...
Medical imaging photo shows abnormality of a blood vessel in the brain that is linked to stroke and other health problems.
Credit: Courtesy of Awad lab, University of Chicago.
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NHLBI in the Press
Researchers are reporting that the presence of abnormal bundles of brittle blood vessels in the brain or spinal cord, called cavernous angiomas (CA), are linked to the composition of a person’s gut bacteria.
Mature woman at the doctor, controlling blood pressure
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Research Features
Pipeline of smart technologies could expand detection of hypertension, save lives It’s the drill at the start of virtually every doctor or hospital visit: having your blood pressure measured. A technician straps a cuff to your upper arm and tightly inflates it. The beeps begin as a machine generates numbers. The cuff slowly deflates. The tech...
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NHLBI in the Press
Many heart diseases have been linked to oxidative stress in which an overabundance of unstable molecules called reactive oxygen species negatively react with other molecules in the cell. But what happens to the heart when there’s antioxidative stress—the opposite of oxidative stress?
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NHLBI in the Press
Heart surgery can save lives, but in some cases, it can also trigger lung and kidney damage and other serious problems for reasons that weren’t clear. Now, NHLBI-sponsored research published in Science Advances has revealed that platelets—blood cells that usually help form clots—set off widespread i
Illustration of the coronavirus showing its round shape covered by spikes.
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NHLBI in the Press
Heart transplant recipients who are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 have a fatality rate of about 25%, much higher than other patient populations, according to a new study. The findings underscore the importance of close monitoring among heart transplant recipients infected with the vir