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Showing 10 out of 1432 results
Pregnant woman watching her baby on the ultrasound
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NHLBI in the Press
Women who have COVID-19 during childbirth are more likely to face complications than women without COVID-19. While the absolute risk for complications is very low, the relative risks for problems like clotting and early labor are significant, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.
Red blood cells clot.
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NHLBI in the Press
Not only do COVID-19 patients have a heightened clotting risk, but they may also have an imbalance in their ability to break down clots, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports.
This photo shows a close-up of plastic bags containing plasma.
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NHLBI in the Press
People who are hospitalized with COVID-19 and not on a ventilator have a reduced risk for death when they receive convalescent plasma with high levels of coronavirus antibodies, according to a study appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Researchers developed a synthetic protein "patch" that may prove helpful in designing future treatment to alter immune function.
Credit: Ian Haydon, UW Medicine
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NHLBI in the Press
A synthetic protein structure may help scientists explore new ways to alter the path of hyperextended immune responses, which could lead to novel treatment for sepsis, type 1 diabetes, and COVID-19.
A healthy assortment of colorful fruits and vegetables
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NHLBI in the Press
Nutrition researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health find people whose diets are rich in anti-inflammatory foods, including leafy greens, dark yellow vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, have fewer incidents of heart attack, stroke, and heart disease years later.
A surgeon holds a purple 3-D printed heart, which is flexible but durable.
Credit: Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering
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NHLBI in the Press
Alginate, a gelatin-like material from seaweed, creates a lifelike feel for 3D-printed hearts. These new prototypes may provide a realistic training tool for simulated surgery.