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Showing 10 out of 139 results
3D models of infant hearts
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Research Feature
Advances in Congenital Heart Disease Research Are Helping Kids Thrive In 1949 when the National Heart Institute—not yet the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute—began awarding research grants in pediatric cardiovascular disease, among the first was to a surgeon named Alfred Blalock, M.D. With his colleagues at Johns Hopkins University—Helen...
A man looks at old pictures with his son
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Research Feature
Visit highlights enormous strides in congenital heart disease research Fifty years ago, amid national protests over the war in Vietnam and giddy anticipation of man’s first walk on the moon, Gladys and Thomas Kaminski drove up to the gates of the National Institutes of Health, holding out hope for a miracle. Tom Kaminski, 7, with his father in 1969...
Dr. Oyebola in the lab.
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Research Feature
A conversation with Dr. Kolapo Oyebola It is not lost on Kolapo Oyebola, Ph.D., that half the sickle cell disease cases worldwide can be found in his native Nigeria. This tragic fact, said the National Institutes of Health (NIH) postdoctoral fellow, has long been top of mind—and he is bent on doing something about it. Something big. He wants to...
Chicken and beef meat in foam packaging
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Research Feature
Detailed comparison suggests plant proteins are better for the heart If you’re among the millions of Americans who are eating more chicken because you think it has less fat and is better for your heart than a good ol’ hot dog or burger, researchers are offering some new food for thought. In a study that could debunk years of conventional wisdom,...
African american grandmother happy after working out
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Research Feature
If you are a woman over 60, move more. Move often. Break those long sitting bouts. Why? Literally, every time you twist, turn, walk, or stand counts towards improving your cardiovascular health. That’s the good-news message from two recently published studies on the cardiovascular effects of sedentary behaviors and light physical activity in older...
T. Morgan Dixon (left) and Vanessa Garrison, founder of GirlTrek.
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Research Feature
Vanessa Garrison and T. Morgan Dixon know a ton about fitness. Between the two, they’ve hiked, walked, biked, and run more miles than they can ever begin to count. But nine years ago, when the two college buddies founded GirlTrek, now the largest public health nonprofit for African American women and girls in the United States, their first thought...
Newborn blood spot (heel prick) test (the Guthrie' test). A physician performing the pinprick puncture in one heel of a newborn to collect their blood to screen for inborn errors of metabolism.
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Research Feature
Soon after birth, a baby in the United States is tested for sickle cell disease, the often-devastating genetic blood disorder affecting more than 100,000 Americans and 20 million of people worldwide. If positive, that newborn typically begins a course of treatment that can greatly prolong life and help stave off complications of the disease. But in...
Illustration of human head with brain and pills.
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Research Feature
The story of the U.S. opioid crisis is often told through numbers. And for many that makes sense, because the numbers are staggering: More than two million Americans suffer from opioid use disorder (OUD), a serious, but treatable chronic illness that claims the lives of more than 130 people every day. Many with OUD carry another burden, however:...
Image of the cover of the January edition of the Transfusion journal
Credit: Transfusion journal
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Research Feature
Every two seconds someone in the United States needs blood. Five million people receive a blood transfusion every year in the U.S. In a country where blood is perennially in short supply, it is the most common medical procedure of all. Yet giving to a blood bank is not always a slam dunk—some people get turned away because of strict rules meant for...