Skip Navigation

Press Releases

Filter Press Releases

An image of an MRI machine at Children's National Medical Center
April 26, 2013

NIH and Children’s National Medical Center open new cardiac intervention suite

A new state-of-the-art facility dedicated to pediatric cardiac imaging and intervention, co-established by the National Institutes of Health and Children’s National Medical Center, was opened with a special dedication ceremony today. The new facility, located at Children’s National in Washington, D.C., is the culmination of a long collaboration combining the cardiac imaging expertise at the NIH’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) with the renowned clinical care at Children’s National.

March 26, 2013

EDTA chelation therapy modestly reduces cardiovascular events

Chelation therapy, an unproven alternative medicine in the treatment for heart disease, modestly reduced cardiovascular events for adults aged 50 and older who had suffered a prior heart attack, according to new NIH-supported research.

March 12, 2013

Benefits of quitting smoking outpace risk of modest weight gain

The improvement in cardiovascular health that results from quitting smoking far outweighs the limited risks to cardiovascular health from the modest amount of weight gained after quitting, reports a National Institutes of Health-funded community study. The study found that former smokers without diabetes had about half as much risk of developing cardiovascular disease as current smokers, and this risk level did not change when post-cessation weight gain was accounted for in the analysis.

March 10, 2013

NIH statement on the vitamin component of the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy

Preliminary results from the vitamin component of the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) were released today during the American College of Cardiology’s 2013 Scientific Sessions. The study found that overall heart attack patients given a combination of high-dose oral vitamins and minerals did not exhibit a significant reduction in recurrent cardiac events over those who did not receive the high-dose vitamins and minerals.

February 6, 2013

Researchers find gene variant linked to aortic valve disease

A newly identified genetic variant doubles the risk of calcium buildup in the heart’s aortic valve. Calcium buildup is the most common cause of aortic stenosis, a narrowing of the aortic valve that can lead to heart failure, stroke, and sudden cardiac death.

January 31, 2013

Next-generation CT scanner provides better images with minimal radiation

A new computed tomography (CT) scanner substantially reduces potentially harmful radiation while still improving overall image quality. National Institutes of Health researchers, along with engineers at Toshiba Medical Systems, worked on the scanner. An analysis of data on 107 patients undergoing heart scans found that radiation exposure was reduced by as much as 95 percent compared to the range of current machines, while the resulting images showed less blurriness, reduced graininess, and greater visibility of fine details.

December 26, 2012

Benefits of higher oxygen, breathing device persist after infancy

By the time they reached toddlerhood, very preterm infants originally treated with higher oxygen levels continued to show benefits when compared to a group treated with lower oxygen levels, according to a follow-up study by a research network of the National Institutes of Health that confirms earlier network findings, Moreover, infants treated with a respiratory therapy commonly prescribed for adults with obstructive sleep apnea fared as well as those who received the traditional therapy for infant respiratory difficulties, the new study found. 

December 4, 2012

NIH Media Availability: New rheumatoid arthritis drug targets NIH-discovered protein

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved a new oral medication for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis that represents a new class of drugs for the disease. The drug, tofacitinib (Xeljanz), provides a new treatment option for adults with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had an inadequate response to, or who are intolerant of, methotrexate, a standard therapy for the disease.

November 21, 2012

CDC and NIH survey provides first report of state-level COPD prevalence

The age-adjusted prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) varies considerably within the United States, from less than 4 percent of the population in Washington and Minnesota to more than 9 percent in Alabama and Kentucky. These state-level rates are among the COPD data available for the first time as part of the newly released 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey.

Page 12 of 63

Pages

Subscribe to NHLBI Press Releases