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Group of hands holding red ribbon stop drugs and HIV/AIDS awareness
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Research Features
Chris Camp recalls the early days of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, when being diagnosed as HIV positive was considered a virtual death sentence. Doctors had no medications that could really help. People with the disease often did not survive more than a year or two. Camp, now 63, says he personally lost more than 500 friends. Among them: his first husband...
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Media Availability
WHAT: The National Institutes of Health have announced five new contract awards for the next phase of the Jackson Heart Study (JHS), the largest research study in history to investigate the biological, genetic , and environmental risk factors associated with the disproportionate burden of cardiovascular disease in African-Americans. Heart disease...
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News Release
A sickle cell anemia study has found that the drug hydroxyurea is as effective as blood transfusions in children to reduce blood flow velocities in the brain, which is a key risk factor for stroke. The findings appear in The Lancet and were presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology. Some children living with sickle cell...
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News Release
Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health’s National Heart,...
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Statement
Preliminary results from the vitamin component of the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) were released today during the American College of Cardiology’s 2013 Scientific Sessions. The study found that overall heart attack patients given a combination of high-dose oral vitamins and minerals did not exhibit a significant reduction in recurrent...