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How Can Cardiomyopathy Be Prevented?

You can't prevent inherited types of cardiomyopathy. However, you can take steps to lower your risk for diseases or conditions that may lead to or complicate cardiomyopathy. Examples include coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, and heart attack.

Your doctor may advise you to make lifestyle changes, such as:

  • Following a healthy diet and being physically active
  • Quitting smoking
  • Avoiding the use of alcohol and illegal drugs
  • Getting enough sleep and rest
  • Reducing stress

For more information about lifestyle changes, go to "How Is Cardiomyopathy Treated?"

Your cardiomyopathy may be due to an underlying disease or condition. If you treat that condition early enough, you may be able to prevent cardiomyopathy complications. For example, to control high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and diabetes:

  • Get regular checkups with your doctor.
  • Follow your doctor's advice about lifestyle changes.
  • Take all of your medicines as your doctor prescribes.

Doctors may be able to prevent sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) if they can identify people at high risk for the condition and treat them with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. (SCA is a complication of cardiomyopathy.)

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Cardiomyopathy Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. To find clinical trials that are currently underway for Cardiomyopathy, visit www.clinicaltrials.gov.


Cardiomyopathy in the News

September 3, 2013
Risk factors identified at diagnosis help predict outcomes for children with rare heart condition
A long-term study of children with a complex heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) found that risk factors identified at diagnosis help to predict outcomes for children with this rare condition.

View all Cardiomyopathy Press Releases

 
January 01, 2011 Last Updated Icon

The NHLBI updates Health Topics articles on a biennial cycle based on a thorough review of research findings and new literature. The articles also are updated as needed if important new research is published. The date on each Health Topics article reflects when the content was originally posted or last revised.

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