Cystic Fibrosis
0
Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic Fibrosis Symptoms

Share

Symptoms of cystic fibrosis depend on which organs are affected and the severity of the condition. Most people who have cystic fibrosis have noticeable symptoms. Some people have few or no symptoms, while others experience severe symptoms or life-threatening complications. Symptoms may also change over time.

Cystic fibrosis most commonly affects the lungs. Some people who have cystic fibrosis may have wheezing and a cough that may produce mucus or blood.

Other symptoms depend on the organs affected and may include:

  • Blockage of the intestine in a baby soon after birth
  • Clubbing of fingers and toes due to less oxygen getting to the hands and feet
  • Fever, which may include night sweats
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as severe abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, or constipation
  • Jaundice, or yellow skin, for an abnormally long time after birth
  • Low body mass index (BMI) or being underweight
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • Delayed growth or puberty
  • Salty skin and saltier than normal sweat
  • sinuses infections
How cystic fibrosis affects the body. Figure A shows the organs that may be affected by cystic fibrosis. Figure B shows a normal airway and the thin layer of mucus lining the wall. Figure C shows an airway with cystic fibrosis.
How cystic fibrosis affects the body. Figure A shows the organs that may be affected by cystic fibrosis. Figure B shows a normal airway and the thin layer of mucus lining the wall. Figure C shows an airway with cystic fibrosis. The widened airway is blocked by thick, sticky mucus that contains blood and bacteria.

When to call the doctor

Cystic fibrosis may have serious complications. Call your doctor right away if you believe you have any of the following.

  • Pulmonary exacerbation involves a worsening of lung symptoms, such as more coughing or wheezing, chest congestion, and a change in mucus color. You may also have weight loss, a poor appetite, or fever.
  • Coughing or spitting up of blood may be a sign that an artery has broken and is bleeding into the airway.
  • Sudden shortness of breath or chest pain may be a sign of a pneumothorax, or collapsed lung.
Last updated on