Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Catalyze

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Catalyze

FAQ pages are for informational purposes only and FOA language supersedes any content included herein.

General Information

See image description

This is a visual depiction of the early translational research supported by the Catalyze Program. (See full description below)

What is Catalyze?

The NHLBI Catalyze program provides a comprehensive suite of support and services to facilitate the translation of basic scientific discoveries into viable therapeutics, devices, and diagnostics ready for human testing.

The program has two main goals:

  • To drive development of new potential heart, lung, blood, and sleep (HLBS)-related therapies and cures —including drugs, devices, diagnostics, and biologics—by supporting early product definition studies and safety testing
  • To support development of novel, enabling platform technologies that catalyze next-generation predictive, diagnostic and therapeutic products. These products will specifically address HLBS-related disorders and diseases.

The Catalyze program supports five funding opportunities, and their funding mechanisms differ in their budget limits, cost sharing requirements, application materials, and project periods. 

What does Catalyze funding support?

This funding supports three overall categories of product development:

  • Therapeutics (small molecules and biologics)
  • Devices, diagnostics, and research tools
  • Enabling technologies and transformative platforms

There are five funding opportunities: two that target therapeutics (dependent on early or late entry stage of development), two that target devices, diagnostics, and tools (dependent on early or late entry stage of development), and one that targets enabling technologies and transformative platforms. The five funding opportunities are summarized in the table below.

FOA # and Title

Funding Mechanism

Funding Purpose

 

RFA-HL-20-023

Product Definition- Small Molecule and Biologic Target Identification and Validation, Assay Development, and Screening

 

R61/R33

phased award

To identify, validate, and screen compounds of interest and to identify a lead compound series to move into preclinical testing for optimization, safety, and efficacy

 

RFA-HL-20-027

Product Definition - Small Molecule and Biologic Lead Series Preliminary Product/Lead Series Identification

 

R33

(Direct to R33)

To develop and move a lead compound series forward to preclinical testing

For projects that have already identified, validated and screened compounds of interest and are therefore far enough along in development to skip R61 stage

 

RFA-HL-20-024

Product Definition - Device Prototype Design/Testing and Diagnostic Disease Target Identification and Assay Development, Research Tool Development

 

R61/R33

phased award

For initial development of prototypes through  testing, identifying diagnostic disease targets and developing associated assays, and developing research tools

 

RFA-HL-20-028

Product Definition - Device prototype testing and Diagnostic disease assay development, and Research Tool Development

 

R33

 

(Direct to R33)

To develop and test existing device prototypes, explore assay components for diagnostics validation, and develop research tools

 

For projects that have already identified and tested initial prototype designs, that have identified a disease target and generated experimental design, or that identified, tested and piloted research tools, and are therefore far enough along in development to skip R61 stage

RFA-HL-20-022

Enabling Technologies and Transformative Platforms

R33

 

(Direct to R33)

 

To develop enabling technologies and transformative platforms to catalyze next-generation predictive, diagnostic, and therapeutic products.

applications must offer the potential for projects to accelerate progress and/or transform current protocol in the areas of early detection and screening, model development, clinical diagnosis, treatment, control, prevention, or epidemiology

 

When are applications due, and when will the projects start?

The first round of applications for non-AIDS related applications is  due on November 8, 2019. The first round of AIDS-related applications is due on December 10, 2019. The earliest start date for both AIDS and non-AIDS related funding opportunities is July 2020.

What is the difference between the phased awards (R61/R33) and the Direct to R33 awards?

Catalyze funding mechanism requirements (budget limits, cost sharing, Accelerator Partnerships, etc.) differ according to the type of technology under development, the stage of development, and the duration of the project. For therapeutic and device/diagnostic/tool development, both phased (R61/R33) and R33 awards are available. Researchers with projects that are earlier in development may apply for phased awards, while those with more advanced projects may apply directly for an R33 opportunity. In a phased award, transition from the R61 phase to the R33 phase is based on successful completion of the R61 phase and meeting additional R33 requirements.

This table summarizes the differences between the funding mechanisms.

FOA #

RFA-HL-20-23

RFA-HL-20-027

RFA-HL-20-24

RFA-HL-20-028

RFA-HL-20-22

Technology Type

Therapeutics

Therapeutics

Devices/Diagnostics/Tools

Devices/Diagnostics/Tools

Enabling Technologies &  Transformative Platforms

FOA Name

Product Definition for Small Molecules and Biologics - Target Identification and Validation, and Preliminary Product/Lead Series Identification (R61/R33 – Clinical Trials Not Allowed)

 

Product Definition for Small Molecules and Biologics - Preliminary Product/Lead Series Identification (R33 - Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

 

Product Definition – Device Prototype Design and Testing, Diagnostic Disease Target Identification and Assay Development, and Research Tool Development (R61/R33

Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

 

Product Definition – Device Prototype Testing and Design Modification, Diagnostic Disease Target Assay Development and Design Characterization, and Research Tool Testing and

Validation (R33 - Clinical Trials Not Allowed)

Enabling Technologies and Transformative Platforms for HLBS Research (R33 - Clinical Trials Not Allowed)

Budget amounts

Maximum direct costs of $350,000 per year in either the R61 or R33 phase

Maximum direct costs of $350,000 per year

 

 

Maximum direct costs of $250,000 per year in either the R61 or R33 phase

 

Maximum direct costs of $250,000 per year.

 

Maximum direct costs of $300,000 per year

 

Cost sharing requirements

For the R33 portion ONLY: minimum 0.25:1 non-federal cash match of the federal direct costs

Minimum of 0.25:1 non-federal cash match of the federal direct costs

For the R33 portion ONLY: minimum 0.25:1 non-federal cash match of the federal direct costs

Minimum of 0.25:1 non-federal cash match of the federal direct costs

No cost sharing required

Letter of support for cost sharing funds

Required to transition from R61 to R33 phase

Required at time of application

Required to transition from R61 to R33

Required at time of application

No cost sharing required

Project period

Maximum combined R61 and R33: 3 years

Up to 2 years in either R61 or R33 allowed

R61 and R33 awards not allowed in same fiscal year

Maximum: 2 years

 

Maximum combined R61 and R33: 3 years

Up to 2 years in either R61 or R33 allowed

R61 and R33 awards not allowed in same fiscal year

Maximum: 2 years

 

Maximum: 2 years

 

Letter of support from Accelerator Partner

Required to transition from R61 to R33

Required at time of application

Required to transition from R61 to R33

Required at time of application

Not required

What is the process for transitioning from the R61 award to the R33 award for development of therapeutics (RFA-HL-20-023) and devices/diagnostics/tools (RFA-HL-20-024)?

To transition from the R61 to R33 phase, awardees must do the following:

Progress and achievement of these requirements will be evaluated by an NHLBI committee tasked with making advancement decisions.

For phased awards, evidence of having secured the cash match and the Accelerator Partner is not required at the time of application, but will be needed at the time of R61 milestone review to transition to an R33 award. 

Matching Funds

What are the cost sharing requirements for phased awards (RFA-HL-20-023 and RFA-HL-20-024)?

Proof of matching funds is not required at the time of application and onset of the R61 phase of these awards, but will be required as part of the transition process to the R33 award. As the R61 phase nears its end, evidence of matching funds must be provided to NIH in the form of a letter of support prior to the meeting of the NHLBI committee that makes the advancement decisions. To be considered responsive to these FOAs, applicants are expected to include a description in the Budget Justification of how the matching funds will be used for the R33 phase of the award. Evidence of the cash match is required prior to release of R33 federal funds. This requirement is not negotiable.

The Enabling Technologies and Transformative Platforms for HLBS Research RFA (RFA-HL-20-022) does not have a cost sharing component.

What are the cost sharing requirements for the non-phased R33 awards for therapeutics (RFA-HL-20-027) and device/diagnostics/tools (RFA-HL-20-028) development?

The non-phased applications must include a letter of support from the non-federal source(s) of cash matching. Applications that do not include this letter  will be considered unresponsive and will not be peer reviewed. Evidence of the cash match is required prior to release of R33 federal funds. This requirement is not negotiable.

The Enabling Technologies and Transformative Platforms for HLBS Research RFA (RFA-HL-20-022) does not have a cost sharing component.

What does and does not count as cash match?

Sources of non-federal funding could include, but are not necessarily limited to, foundations, participating institutions, a state or local governmental body, angel investors, venture capital firms, individual benefactors, or any combination of the above.

In-kind contributions are encouraged, but do NOT apply to the cash matching requirements and do not need to be reported to the NIH. Institutions must be able to document their actual contributions to the project and provide assurances that the organization(s) are committed to providing the funds and resources for their share of the project.

Federal funds may NOT be used as a source of matching funds.

Generally, cost matching requirements may NOT be met from the following sources:

  • Costs borne by another federal grant or sub award
  • Costs or contributions toward cost sharing on another federal grant, a federal procurement, contract, or any other award of Federal funds
  • Cost of services or property financed by income earned by contractors under a contract from the recipient (or sub recipient)
  • Program income
  • Patient incentives

Accelerator Partners

What is an Accelerator Partner, and what are the program requirements for having one?

Accelerator Partners are commercialization experts working as development partners with innovators whose projects are funded through the Catalyze program. Accelerator Partners help innovator-researchers achieve the necessary multidisciplinary approach for developing technologies. Accelerator Partners provide skills development and mentoring to enable innovator-researchers to assess the medical and commercial potential of their projects. They also help advance the proposed projects to a stage suitable to continue product development in the private sector or to apply for support through the NHLBI Catalyze Preclinical or other translational programs.

Accelerator Partners may do this by connecting innovator-researchers with people such as:

  • experienced entrepreneurs and scientists, including those who can facilitate interactions with businesses, industries, sources of private capital, and research-performing institutions
  • potential licensing and commercialization partners who can offer advice soon after the researcher gets an award
  • ecosystem partners, such as those from biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies, who are knowledgeable about the process for developing therapeutics, devices, and diagnostics 
  • experts such as clinicians and biostatisticians who are familiar with how the desired product should look to meet vested shared interests
  • potential partners who have complementary development expertise and resources for successful project development

Accelerator partners are encouraged to provide access to expertise and mentoring related to: product development stages, business development and commercialization strategy, market analysis, preparation of regulatory submissions, intellectual property protection, and reimbursement strategy. Awardees are highly encouraged to use Accelerator Partners for this kind of career development, as these experts can facilitate exposure to the myriad processes required to translate discoveries into therapies.

Applicants are expected to consider how they will identify and foster relationships with Accelerator Partners. At least one Accelerator Partner is required for the R33 portion of the phased awards and the R33 only awards. An Accelerator Partner is not required for RFA-HL-20-022.

For phased awards, awardees will be expected to search for an Accelerator Partner early in the R61 phase. For phased awards, proof of an Accelerator partner is not required at the time of application; however, evidence that an Accelerator Partner has been identified must be provided to NIH in the form of a letter of support prior to the meeting of the NHLBI committee that will decide whether an awardee will transition from the R61 to the R33 award. Transition from R61 to R33 is contingent on procurement of an Accelerator Partner. For R33 only awards, the Accelerator Partner must be identified at the time of application.

Can the Accelerator Partner provide cash matching funds?

Yes. It is acceptable for an Accelerator Partner to provide cash matching funds for the R33 stage, but it is not required.

Milestones

What are milestones?

Milestones are goals that are clear and quantifiable for measuring success that can be used for go/no-go decision making and have timelines and quantitative criteria associated with them. All milestones should be useful as a measure of progress toward the overall goal of the project. Milestones must be identified in the application, and based on comments of the peer review panel, they may be negotiated pre-award by the NHLBI team. NHLBI staff will meet annually to monitor progress against proposed milestones and make non-competing award decisions.

Specific aims or a list of activities planned for each year are not considered milestones because they are not always measurable and do not provide decision-making goals.

Are milestones required for Catalyze awards?

Milestones are required for all RFAs (RFA-HL-20-023, 024, 027, and 028) except the Enabling Technologies and Transformative Platforms for HLBS Research (RFA-HL-20-022) RFA.

Phased awards (RFA-HL-20-023 and RFA-HL-20-024). To be responsive to this FOA, applicants must meet the entry criteria to be eligible for the award and propose two separate sets of clear, quantifiable milestones with timelines (one set each for the R61 and R33 phases) to be completed sequentially within a three-year period, but with no more than two years in either stage.

Milestones for the R61 and R33 activities must be submitted at the time of application and will be reviewed simultaneously; however, receipt of funding for the R33 component of phased awards is contingent on achieving pre-specified milestones during the R61 component. Completion of milestones will ensure sufficient progress during the R61 phase to provide the feasibility and scientific rationale to conduct the product definition activities proposed in the R33.

Non-phased R33 awards (RFA-HL-20-027 and RFA-HL-20-028). To be considered responsive to the FOA, applicants must meet the entry criteria to be eligible for the award and propose milestones to be completed during the duration of award. These milestones will ensure that projects are sufficiently progressing to be in a position to for further development, including entering into preclinical programs following completion of the award.

What else do I need to know about milestones?

Milestones must be identified in the application and may be negotiated, pre-award, by the NHLBI team based on comments from the peer review panel. NHLBI emphasizes the importance of the robustness and reproducibility of experimental results in evaluating progress. For the phased awards, investigators must exhibit successful completion of milestones for consideration of transition to the R33 phase. 

Intellectual Property, Regulatory and Project Management Requirement

What are the intellectual property (IP) or regulatory strategy requirements for these FOAs?

Applicants are required to submit their IP and regulatory strategies in their applications. Projects that are appropriate for these FOAs must be at the stage of development where IP and regulatory strategies are being considered. For phased awards, continued development of IP and regulatory strategies will be required and considered for a transition from the R61 phase to the R33 phase of the award.

No IP or regulatory strategy requirements are required for the Enabling Technologies and Transformative Platforms funding opportunity (RFA-HL-20-022).

What are the Project Management requirements for these awards?

Each project is expected to use milestone-driven project management processes that make it possible to  assess progress on a continuous basis, relative to established milestones.

Project management processes are not required for the Enabling Technologies and Transformative Platforms funding opportunity (RFA-HL-20-022).

Are there special requirements for the Enabling Technologies and Transformative Platforms funding opportunity?

The Enabling Technologies and Transformative Platforms funding opportunity has a funding mechanism similar to more traditional ones and does not require cost sharing, formal project management, IP and regulatory strategies, milestones, or accelerator partnering.

FAQ pages are for informational purposes only and FOA language supersedes any content included herein.


Full Image Description

This is a visual depiction of the early translational research supported by the Catalyze Program. The title that appears above the image (except a block marked FDA) says Early Translational Research Supported by Catalyze. An asterisk next to that content indicates that the Catalyze Program does not support clinical trials or engagement with the FDA.

The image depicts three technology types: drugs, biologics, devices and diagnostics, each of which shows a progression through Product Definition and then Preclinical.

For both drugs and biologics, Product Definition includes Disease Target, then the progression is divided.

Drugs, after Disease Target (still under product definition) has Develop Assay, High-throughput Screening and Hit-to-Lead. Then under Preclinical it has Lead Optimization and then Animal Safety & Efficacy.

Biologics, after disease target (still under Product Definition) has Mechanism of Action and Product Definition. Then under Preclinical for Biologics it has Pre-clinical, Characterization, and Scale Manufacturing.

Separate from Drugs and Biologics is Devices and Diagnostics. Under Product Definition for Devices and Diagnostics there is Concept, followed by Design and then Prototype Development. Under Preclinical for Devices and Diagnostics it has Verification and Validation, Scale Manufacturing, and Animal Testing

The block that says FDA is outside from under the block that says Supported by Catalyze to show that the program does not support engagement with the FDA.