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Healthy Communities Study: How Communities Shape Children’s Health (HCS)

BAA NHLBI-HC-10-15
Project Period: 8/1/2010 - 7/31/2015
Contact: Dr. Sonia Arteaga

The Healthy Communities Study: How Communities Shape Children’s Health (HCS) will address the need for a cross-cutting national study of community programs and policies and their relationship with childhood obesity.

The HCS is an observational study of communities conducted over five years that aims to (1) determine the associations between community programs/policies and Body Mass Index (BMI), diet, and physical activity in children; (2) identify the community, family, child factors that modify or mediate the associations between community programs/policies and BMI, diet, and physical activity in children, and (3) assess the associations between program/policies and BMI, diet, and physical activity in children in communities that have a high proportion of African American, Latino, and/or low income residents. About 260 communities and over 21,000 elementary and middle school aged children and their parents will be part of the HCS. The study examines quantitative and qualitative information obtained from community-based initiatives, community characteristics (e.g., school environment), and from child and parent assessments and measurements of children’s physical activity levels, dietary practices of children, and children’s and parent’s BMI.

The study is funded by several National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and centers including the NHLBI, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child and Health and Human Development, and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences. In addition to the NIH scientific partners, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) are also partners in this study.

Press release: http://www.nih.gov/news/health/sep2010/nhlbi-09.htm




Last Updated February 2013




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