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Dr. Young In The News

October 22, 2012 : Elsevier Connect
Finding cures for mystery diseases
Len Maniace
NIH researcher and Elsevier editor Neal S. Young honored for solving aplastic anemia and other medical puzzles.

October 5, 2012 : GovExec.com
The NIH doctor who pioneered life-saving treatments
The Partnership for Public Service
For years, patients with severe aplastic anemia died within months of developing the rare blood disease. Dr. Neal Young has increased the survival rate to 80 percent.

September 27, 2012 : NIH Record
NIH scientists receive 2012 Service to America Medals
Dr. Neal Young, chief of NHLBI's Hematology Branch, received the Sammie in the Science and Environment category.

September 14, 2012 : Government Executive Fedblog
What serving America is all about
Tom Shoop
One especially inspiring moment came near the end of the event, when Dr. Neal Young, chief of the Hematology Branch at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at NIH, discussed his efforts to come up with a new treatment for aplastic anemia, a rare blood disorder.

September 13, 2012 : Service to America Medals
2012 Science and Environment Medal Recipient Neal A. Young
This medal recognizes a federal employee for a significant contribution to the nation in activities related to science and environment (including biomedicine, economics, energy, information technology, meteorology, resource conservation, and space). Because of Dr. Neal Young’s efforts, his clinic at NIH is today considered one of the world’s major referral centers for patients with bone marrow failure syndromes, including aplastic anemia.

September 13, 2012 : The Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation
AA&MDSIF medical advisory board member receives prestigious government award
The Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation is pleased to announce that AA&MDSIF Medical Advisory Board member, Dr. Neal Young, has just been awarded the 2012 Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Science and Environment medal.

September 13, 2012 : The Washington Post
Winners of Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals for federal workers announced
Steve Vogel
Neal Young, chief of the hematology branch at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health, was honored with the Science and Environment Medal for groundbreaking research and treatments for patients with bone marrow failure diseases, including the rare and once deadly blood disorder known as aplastic anemia.

September 11, 2012 : The Washington Post
NIH scientist helped solve a frightening bone marrow mystery
Alyssa A. Botelho
"The idea that you would treat the immune system for the anemia was novel. . . . It was a scientific insight with immediate repercussions," said Dr. Young of the NHLBI. Dr. Young's breakthrough research on aplastic anemia, a rare blood disease, led to his selection as a finalist for one of the Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals ("Sammies") in the Science and Environment category.

September 11, 2012 : GovLoop
Federal success – NIH scientist fights back against bone marrow failures
Chris Dorobek
Dr. Young of the NHLBI conceived, designed and headed the first multicenter clinical trial in the United States for immunosuppressive therapy for aplastic anemia. The regimen he developed for this blood disease has become standard therapy for patients all over the world.

August 30, 2012 : Federal News Radio
NIH doctor's work transforms once-fatal illness
Tom Temin and Emily Kopp
The NHLBI's Dr. Neal Young shares highlights from his breakthrough research on aplastic anemia, a rare blood disease, that led to his selection as a finalist for one of the Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals ("Sammies") in the Science and Environment category.

July 17, 2012 : Johns Hopkins Medicine
Happy Hematologist
Neil A. Grauer
In the spring/summer issue of Johns Hopkins Medicine Magazine, Hematology branch chief and Hopkins alum Neal Young reflects on the joys of working at the NIH.

July 5, 2012 : New England Journal of Medicine
Eltrombopag and Improved Hematopoiesis in Refractory Aplastic Anemia
Co-authored by Matthew J. Olnes, M.D., Ph.D., Phillip Scheinberg, M.D., Ronan Desmond, M.D., Yong Tang, M.D., Ph.D., Bogdan Dumitriu, M.D., Ankur R. Parikh, M.D., Susan Soto, B.S.N., Xingmin Feng, M.D., Ph.D., Neal S. Young, M.D., and Cynthia E. Dunbar, M.D. from the Hematology Branch, and Colin O. Wu, Ph.D. from the Office of Biostatistics Research
Dunbar and colleagues report that the drug Eltrombopag can improve the blood cell counts of some people who have a severe form of aplastic anemia that is unresponsive to standard therapies.

June 1, 2012 : AOL Government.
Feds@Work: NIH's Neal Young, world expert on bone marrow failure
Partnership for Public Service
In his work at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Dr. Neal Young has combined pioneering basic laboratory science, clinical research protocols, and direct patient care to save the lives of thousands of people suffering from a blood disorder that wipes out the cells in the bone marrow, including red blood cells that carry oxygen, white blood cells that fight infection and platelets that help clot the blood.

May 9, 2012 : The Scientist
Telomeres in Disease
Rodrigo Calado and Neal Young
Telomeres have been linked to numerous diseases over the years, but how exactly short telomeres cause diseases and how medicine can prevent telomere erosion are still up for debate.

January 11, 2012 : The Washington Post
Saving the lives of patients with rare blood diseases
The NHLBI's Dr. Neal Young was profiled by The Washington Post for his research on life-saving treatments for aplastic anemia and his clinical and basic studies of other blood diseases. "I love my job and NIH. There is tremendous intellectual freedom. I can take care of patients in a very special way, focus on unusual or rare diseases and receive support to do transformative work," said Dr. Young.

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Last Updated: April 12, 2012

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