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Dr. Loria In The News

April 21, 2014 : Nature Outlook
Treatment: Marginal gains
Emily Anthes
Behavioural interventions work, but not for everyone, and weight regain is common. Are there better ways to treat obesity? “We have developed some good interventions for weight control, and those can be very effective in helping people achieve clinically significant weight loss,” says Susan Czajkowski, a research psychologist at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, and the lead project officer of the Obesity Related Behavioral Intervention (ORBIT) trials. “But we need to work on ways to help people initiate these changes in their lives and to stick with them.”

February 18, 2014 : Johns Hopkins Medicine
Obese patients who feel judged by doctors are less likely to shed pounds, study shows
Overweight and obese people who feel their physicians are judgmental of their size are more likely to try to shed pounds but are less likely to succeed, according to results of an NHLBI-funded study at Johns Hopkins.

February 4, 2014 : Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Forging a future of better cardiovascular health: addressing childhood obesity
coauthored by Charlotte A. Pratt, Ph.D., Sonia Arteaga, Ph.D., and Cay Loria, Ph.D., Division of Cardiovascular Sciences
This paper describes ongoing National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-initiated childhood obesity research. It calls on clinicians, researchers, and cardiologists to work with other healthcare providers, community agencies, schools and caregivers to foster better cardiovascular health in children by intervening on multiple levels of influence on childhood obesity.

January 9, 2013 : TIME Healthland
What mice can tell us about obesity and genetics
Alexandra Sifferlin
While our eating habits certainly play a role in how much we weigh, according to NIH-supported research our rodent cousins confirm that some of our risk for obesity is written in our genes.

January 8, 2013 : UCLA
Genes and obesity: Fast food isn't only culprit in expanding waistlines -- DNA is also to blame
Susan Thomas
In a new NHLBI-supported study, UCLA scientists discovered that body-fat responses to a typical fast-food diet are determined in large part by genetic factors, and they have identified several genes they say may control those responses.

December 20, 2012 : Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Physicians admit feeling under qualified and lacking necessary education to treat obesity
According to a new NHLBI-supported study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, primary care physicians agree they may not be the best health care professionals to give weight related counseling.

December 15, 2012 : MedPage Today
Obesity hormone linked to pancreatic cancer
Michael Smith
Low levels of the obesity-related hormone adiponectin are associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, according to NIH-supported research.

December 3, 2012 : NIH News in Health
Counting carbs? Understanding glycemic index and glycemic load
You’ve probably heard of glycemic index and glycemic load. Researchers developed the glycemic index to measure the quality of carbs in foods while the glycemic load captures both the types of carbs in a food and the amount of carbs in a serving.

September 14, 2012 : Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Forging a future of better cardiovascular health: Addressing childhood obesity
coauthored by Charlotte A. Pratt, Ph.D., Sonia Arteaga, Ph.D., and Catherine Loria, Ph.D., Division of Cardiovascular Sciences
This paper describes ongoing National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-initiated childhood obesity research as an example of efforts to foster better cardiovascular health in children. Strategies for improving clinical care of obese children and adolescents are discussed.

July 26, 2012 : Boston University School of Medicine
BUSM study identifies adenosine receptor's role in regulating high fat diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes
A recent study led by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) demonstrates that the A2b-type adenosine receptor, A2bAR, plays a significant role in the regulation of high fat, high cholesterol diet-induced symptoms of type 2 diabetes. The findings, which are published online in PLoS ONE, also identify A2bAR as a potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

December 2, 2011 : NIH News in Health
Weighing in on dietary fats: Some fats are healthier than others
With the winter holidays upon us, you’ll likely be surrounded by family, friends and plenty of good food. Many of these foods, though, can be high in fat. Learn which fats are naughty and which are nice to your health. Then you can make smarter food choices.

September 12, 2011 : Annals of Internal Medicine
Lifestyle factors and risk for new-onset diabetes: a population-based cohort study
coauthored by Jared P. Reis, Ph.D.; Catherine M. Loria, Ph.D.; and Paul D. Sorlie, Ph.D., NHLBI Division of Cardiovascular Sciences
Epidemiologic data on the combined influence of several lifestyle factors on diabetes risk are rare, particularly among older adults.

August 3, 2011 : CHEST
Ahead of the curve
Joel Moss, M.D., Ph.D., NHLBI Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch
In this issue of CHEST, we introduce a new section called "Ahead of the Curve." The objective of the series is to offer our readers an edge in a fast-changing environment.

November 29, 2010
Trials use technology to help young adults achieve healthy weights
To engage young adults in protecting their future heart health, the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) has funded seven clinical trials that combine behavioral weight management programs with technologies such as text messaging, online social networking, and Bluetooth-enabled scales.

November 29, 2010 : University of Minnesota School of Public Health
U of M study to use technology to help young adults achieve and maintain healthy weights.
Statistics show young adults are at high risk of becoming overweight or obese, dramatically increasing their risk of obesity and health complications such as heart disease later in life.

March 5, 2010 : NIH News in Health
The salty stuff: Salt, blood pressure and your health
Salt is essential to our body's fluids. That's likely why we evolved to enjoy its taste. On the other hand, anyone who’s gotten a mouth full of seawater knows that too much salt tastes terrible. Maybe your body's trying to tell you something. It turns out that too much salt can lead to a host of health problems.

November 10, 2009
NHLBI Publishes New Heart Healthy Cookbook
To help busy people and families shop for, prepare, and serve healthy meals, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health created and published Keep the Beat Recipes: Deliciously Healthy Dinners. The new cookbook features 75 simple and delicious recipes influenced by Asian, Latino, Mediterranean, and American cuisine that are good for your heart and taste great too.

April 27, 2007
Love Your Heart: New NHLBI Resource Helps Women Reduce Heart Disease Risk
A must read for women who want to show their hearts some love, "The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women" is an invaluable and easy-to-use resource every woman should read from cover to cover. A full-color, 122-page booklet from The Heart Truth campaign, it is packed with the latest information on preventing and controlling the risk factors for heart disease – the No.1 killer of women.

April 16, 2007
NHLBI Study: Having Elevated Risk Factors in Young Adulthood Significantly Raises Risk of Coronary Calcium Later On
Having above optimal levels of risk factors for heart disease between the ages of 18 and 30 can mean a two to three times greater risk of later developing coronary calcium, a strong predictor of heart disease, according to results of a new study from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.

November 8, 2004
Young Adults who Maintain Their Weight, Even if Overweight, Have Lower Risk Factor Levels for Heart Disease in Early Middle Age
Young adults who maintain their weight over time, even if they are overweight, have lower risk factor levels for heart disease and are less likely to develop metabolic syndrome in middle age than those whose weight increases, according to the results of a large multi-center study funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health and presented at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association.

November 30, 1999
Sodium Intake Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Disease Death in Overweight Persons
A diet high in sodium increases the risk of heart disease-related mortality in overweight individuals, according to a study published in the December 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

October 26, 1999
JAMA Spotlights the Health Risks of Obesity
The October 27, 1999, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) spotlights the health risks of obesity, a major risk factor for heart disease.

June 17, 1998
First Federal Obesity Clinical Guidelines Released
The first Federal guidelines on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults were released today by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), in cooperation with the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

June 3, 1998
Statement on First Federal Obesity Clinical Guidelines
The first Federal guidelines on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults are scheduled to be released on June 17 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), in cooperation with the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

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Last Updated: April 20, 2012