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Dr. Levy In The News

February 25, 2014 : redOrbit
11 new genetic variants associated with high blood pressure discovered
An international team of researchers has identified 11 new DNA sequence variants associated with blood pressure levels and heart disease, 10 of which could be are in or near genes encoding proteins and appear to be likely targets for drugs that are currently available or in development.

September 17, 2013 : Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
African-American study identifies four common genetic variants associated with blood pressure
Largest study of its kind, supported by the NHLBI, finds multiple ethnicities impacted by the genetic variations.

September 17, 2013 : HealthDay
Genes tied to high blood pressure found in black Americans
Black Americans are more likely to develop high blood pressure than whites, and a large new NHLBI-supported study has pinpointed four common genetic variations affecting their risk.

December 26, 2012 : Journal of the American Medical Association
Combating the epidemic of heart disease
Daniel Levy, M.D., Center for Population Studies
In this Journal of the American Medical Association editorial, Dr. Daniel Levy, director of the NHLBI’s Center for Population Studies and Framingham Heart Study, discusses a recent study about atherosclerosis (a disease in which plaque builds up inside the arteries) among U.S. service members and the importance of continuing to combat the heart disease epidemic.

December 17, 2012 : Columbia University Medical Center
Perceived stress may predict future risk of coronary heart disease
Are you stressed? NIH-supported researchers at Columbia University Medical Center found that perceived stress may help predict a person’s future risk of coronary heart disease.

November 5, 2012
Two NIH landmark studies show power of epidemiology research; underscore need to address health disparities
Heart disease risk factors are widespread among Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States, with 80 percent of men and 71 percent of women having at least one risk factor for heart disease, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. 

September 5, 2012 : Journal of the American Medical Association
Aortic stiffness, blood pressure progression, and incident hypertension
coauthored by Daniel Levy, M.D., NHLBI Center for Population Sciences and Framingham Heart Study
Results from the NHLBI Framingham Heart Study indicate that increased stiffness of the aorta, the main artery that carries oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the body, is associated with a higher risk of hypertension, or high blood pressure.

September 4, 2012 : HealthDay
Artery stiffness may predict high blood pressure
Results from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study suggest possible clues to hypertension prevention.

August 29, 2012
NIH Media Availability: Protein linked to increased risk of heart failure and death in older adults
A protein known as galectin-3 can identify people at higher risk of heart failure, according to new research supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

August 29, 2012 : Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Galectin-3, a marker of cardiac fibrosis, predicts incident heart failure in the community
coauthored by Daniel Levy, M.D., NHLBI Center for Population Sciences and Framingham Heart Study, and Jennifer Ho, M.D., special volunteer, Framingham Heart Study.
A protein found in the blood called galectin-3 can identify people at higher risk of heart failure, according to recent results from the NHLBI Framingham Heart Study.

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Last Updated: August 22, 2012

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