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Dr. Kiley In The News

August 20, 2014 : IowaNow
Cystic fibrosis mucus defect present at birth
New research by University of Iowa scientists and partially funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute shows that cystic fibrosis (CF), a life-shortening, inherited condition that affects about 30,000 Americans, causes a mucus defect that reduces the ability to clear particles and germs out of the airway.

August 12, 2014 : Triad Business Journal
Wake Forest Baptist receives $7M grant for lung injury clinical trials
Owen Covington
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center will receive a $7 million, seven-year grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute as part of a broader network of research centers that is looking at the prevention and early treatment of acute lung injury.

June 24, 2014 : PhysOrg
Fantastic voyage into the human lung
A team of investigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles has been awarded $4 million over five years by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) for LungMAP, an atlas of the developing human lung. Borrowing from Hollywood blockbusters, the researchers are employing state-of-the-art animation technology in combination with advanced optical imaging and high-resolution x-ray imaging techniques. This novel technology will allow them to explore the composition and interaction of cells in the developing lung and to follow how the processes evolve over time.

May 20, 2014 : Forbes
Disappointing results for statins in two NIH trials
Larry Husten
Two NHLBI studies have failed to find any benefit for statin therapy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

May 19, 2014 : HealthDay
Vitamin D Supplements May Not Help Ease Asthma
Robert Preidt
Vitamin D supplements do little to help control asthma in people with low Vitamin D levels, a new study found, although they might help cut the level of medication some patients need.

May 18, 2014
NIH-funded studies find statins provide no benefit to COPD, ARDS outcomes
Statin therapy does not prevent exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or lower mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), report two studies that rigorously tested the benefit of the cholesterol-lowering drugs on outcomes in the lung diseases.

January 29, 2014 : Physicians Weekly
Surveying the COPD scene
Lack of communication between patients and healthcare providers about COPD remains a major barrier to diagnosing the disease. While awareness is increasing, particularly among smokers, the challenge remains to further educate others about COPD and the available treatments for it.

December 6, 2013 : MedlinePlus Magazine
Apolo Ohno: Breathing easier
Apolo Anton Ohno, winner of eight Winter Olympic medals for short-track speedskating, had to first overcome exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB). The condition is a temporary narrowing of the airways during or after exercise.

November 15, 2013
NIH survey identifies barriers to effective patient-provider dialogue about COPD
Lack of communication between patients and health care providers about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains a major barrier to diagnosis of this disease, according to the results of a Web-based survey released today by the National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.

September 20, 2013 : Washington Post
FDA, NIH awarding millions to create 14 centers to do tobacco research related to regulation
The Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health are awarding millions in funding to create 14 centers to conduct research on tobacco products. The centers can eventually receive more than $273 million over the next five years for research on marketing of tobacco products, adverse health consequences, ways to reduce addiction and toxicity, economics, policies and communications, as well as so-called modified risk tobacco products and electronic cigarettes.

September 19, 2013 : NIH News
FDA and NIH create first-of-kind Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) today, as part of an on-going interagency partnership, have awarded a total of up to $53 million to fund tobacco-related research in fiscal year 2013 to create 14 Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science (TCORS). These centers will be coordinated by NIH’s Office of Disease Prevention, and administered by three NIH institutes— the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

July 24, 2013 : UPenn Perelman School of Medicine
Common stem cell in heart and lung development explains adaption for life on land, connections between diseases, Penn study finds
In a new paper published this week online in Nature, a team from the Perelman School of Medicine shows that the pulmonary vasculature, the blood vessels that connect the heart to the lung, develops even in the absence of the lung. Mice in which lung development is inhibited still have pulmonary blood vessels, which revealed to the researchers that cardiac progenitors, or stem cells, are essential for cardiopulmonary co-development.

May 7, 2013 : The Dallas Weekly
Breathe easier this summer: tips to control your child's asthma
The joys of summer can be challenging if your child has asthma, a common but serious chronic disease. The NHLBI has tips on how to manage this condition.

April 11, 2013 : Boston University School of Medicine
BUSM researchers identify novel approach to study COPD and treatment efficacy
NHLBI-supported researchers at Boston University School of Medicine have pinpointed a genetic signature for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) from airway cells harvested using a minimally invasive procedure.

December 26, 2012
Benefits of higher oxygen, breathing device persist after infancy
By the time they reached toddlerhood, very preterm infants originally treated with higher oxygen levels continued to show benefits when compared to a group treated with lower oxygen levels, according to a follow-up study by a research network of the National Institutes of Health that confirms earlier network findings, Moreover, infants treated with a respiratory therapy commonly prescribed for adults with obstructive sleep apnea fared as well as those who received the traditional therapy for infant respiratory difficulties, the new study found. 

December 3, 2012 : NIH News in Health
Technique may improve COPD detection
An experimental method can distinguish between different types of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and track disease progression. The method may eventually lead to more accurate diagnoses and more effective treatments for COPD, a lung disease that makes it hard to breathe.

November 21, 2012
CDC and NIH survey provides first report of state-level COPD prevalence
The age-adjusted prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) varies considerably within the United States, from less than 4 percent of the population in Washington and Minnesota to more than 9 percent in Alabama and Kentucky. These state-level rates are among the COPD data available for the first time as part of the newly released 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey.

November 16, 2012
COPD awareness returns to 2008 levels, according to new NIH survey
Awareness of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been rising gradually in recent years, but the results of a national survey show current awareness levels have returned to those of 2008. The survey was released today by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.

October 19, 2012
NHLBI launches program on early cystic fibrosis lung disease
Researchers will study pre-symptomatic lung disease in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis (CF), under a new grant program of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). Results could reveal how CF develops, which in turn could lead to interventions that delay or prevent disease progression. The studies also could provide critical information to help resolve competing theories on the origin and progression of CF-associated abnormalities

September 14, 2012 : Circulation Research
On the value of portfolio diversity in heart, lung, and blood research
Zorina S. Galis, Ph.D., W. Keith Hoots, M.D., James P. Kiley, Ph.D., and Michael S. Lauer, M.D., NHLBI
Just as in other fields, scientific diversity has been and continues to be critical for the success of HLB research.

September 13, 2012
No significant difference in asthma control across three approaches to adjust medication dose in mild asthma
A study comparing three common approaches to periodically adjust the dosage of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for people with mild asthma has found no detectable differences in how often a person’s asthma worsened. The methods examined in this study were a patient-guided modification based on symptoms, an assessment made by an examining physician, or the results of a breath test to measure inflammation.

September 12, 2012 : MedPage Today
Three Approaches Equal for Asthma Medication Adjustment
Kristina Fiore
When it comes to adjusting the dose of inhaled corticosteroids for better asthma control, periodic physician assessment was as good a gauge as using a biomarker or day-to-day symptom occurrence, researchers found.

September 10, 2012 : Washington Post
Steroid medications taken for asthma can cause growth to slow in children who have not reached puberty. Is this lasting, or might the children catch up by the time they reach their adult height?
Linda Searing
Steroid medications taken for asthma can cause growth to slow in children who have not reached puberty. Is this lasting, or might the children catch up by the time they reach their adult height?

September 3, 2012
Inhaled corticosteroids for childhood asthma may affect adult height
Adults who had been treated previously with the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide as part of a children’s clinical study were, on average, about half an inch shorter than their study counterparts who were not treated with inhaled corticosteroids, according to research funded by the NIH. The half inch difference had been observed when the study participants were children, showing that, while the effect on height does not go away, it also does not get worse, the researchers say.

August 13, 2012 : Circulation Research
Editorial: On the value of portfolio diversity in heart, lung, and blood research
coauthored by Zorina S. Galis, Ph.D., W. Keith Hoots, M.D., James P. Kiley, Ph.D., and Michael Lauer, M.D., NHLBI
This editorial examines the diversity of topics and mechanisms in the NHLBI portfolio.

July 12, 2012 : Weill Cornell Medical College
Researchers to use novel metabolomics technology to discover which cigarette smokers are at highest risk for COPD
Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College were awarded a $6.5 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute for a five-year investigation into metabolic changes occurring within airway epithelial cells in the lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients caused by cigarette smoking.

young girl breathing into spirometer

May 1, 2012
World Asthma Day 2012
On World Asthma Day 2012, we at the National Institutes of Health stand together with the international community to renew our dedication to improving quality of life for the millions of people living with asthma.

January 24, 2012
Treatment of silent acid reflux does not improve asthma in children, NIH study finds
Adding the acid reflux drug lansoprazole to a standard inhaled steroid treatment for asthma does not improve asthma control in children who have no symptom of acid reflux, according to a new study funded in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

November 21, 2011
COPD awareness continues to rise, new NIH survey finds
Awareness of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), the nation’s third leading killer, continues to rise in the United States, according to the results of a Web-based survey released today by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.

August 24, 2011
Commonly prescribed antibiotic reduces acute COPD attacks
Adding a common antibiotic to the usual daily treatment regimen for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can reduce the occurrence of acute exacerbations and improve quality of life, reports new results from a clinical trial funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

August 3, 2011 : CHEST
Advancing respiratory research
James P. Kiley, M.S., Ph.D., NHLBI Division of Lung Diseases
Respiratory diseases remain a major public health problem in the United States and worldwide, with increasing morbidity and mortality. Substantial progress has been made to advance understanding of the basic mechanisms of lung disease and to optimize clinical management of patients with a range of respiratory diseases.

July 29, 2011 : Advance for Respiratory Care & Sleep Medicine
Racing against COPD
Valerie Neff Newitt
The NHLBI's Dr. Kiley underscores the importance of continued research into COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), the third leading cause of death in the U.S. "We've laid out a vision, set goals, and are pushing for better understanding," Dr. Kiley said. "In the past, there wasn't too much in the medical toolbox for COPD. That is unacceptable; that has to be turned around."

May 2, 2011 : American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care
Opportunities in pulmonary research; not a time to step back
James P. Kiley, M.S., Ph.D., NHLBI Division of Lung Diseases
Translational research in lung disease is paying off. In just the past decade, for example, research has led to a new therapy for lymphangioleiomyomatosis, which may also halt progression of this rare lung disease virtually unknown 15 years ago.

April 20, 2011
Common genetic variant linked to pulmonary fibrosis risk
Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have identified a common genetic variant associated with substantially increased risk of developing pulmonary fibrosis, a debilitating and life-threatening lung condition.

March 31, 2011
NHLBI funds nine organizations to improve awareness of COPD
Nine state and local organizations will receive a total of $383,000 for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) education initiatives, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announced today.

November 9, 2010
New NIH data show gains in COPD awareness
The number of Americans who report being aware of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, increased by 4 percentage points between 2008 and 2010, but many people at risk are still unaware of the disease, according to mailed survey results released today by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

September 19, 2010
Possible alternate therapy for adults with poorly controlled asthma
A drug commonly used for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) successfully treats adults whose asthma is not well-controlled on low doses of inhaled corticosteroids, reported researchers supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

March 2, 2010
Childhood Asthma Treatment: Not One-Size-Fits-All
A new study has found the addition of long-acting beta-agonist therapy to be the most effective of three step-up, or supplemental, treatments for children whose asthma is not well controlled on low doses of inhaled corticosteroids alone.

December 17, 2009
Media availability: Genetic Variant May Control Lung Function and Risk of COPD
Researchers have discovered evidence that suggests a genetic variant may be associated with better preserved lung function among children with asthma and adults who smoke, according to a new study funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), which is part of the National Institutes of Health.

December 13, 2009
NIH-Funded Study Unveils Potential Genetic Links to Lung Disease Risk
A new study involving data from more than 20,000 individuals has uncovered several DNA sequences linked to impaired pulmonary function. The findings may ultimately lead to better understanding of lung function and diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

December 2, 2009
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Initiates Thirteen New Projects to Advance Asthma Control
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health has approved the award of 13 contracts to local organizations across the country to develop, implement, and test science-based approaches to improve asthma control using evidence-based national guidelines for diagnosing and managing asthma.

November 2, 2009
Survey: Awareness of COPD – The Nation's Fourth Leading Cause Of Death – Is Rising, But Understanding Is Still Low
Awareness of COPD—chronic obstructive pulmonary disease—continues to grow in the United States, according to national survey results released today by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.

October 1, 2009
The NHLBI's COPD Learn More Breathe Better Campaign Expands Community Network
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health has approved the award of 15 contracts under its communications contract with Porter Novelli totaling $462,000 to leading community-based lung health organizations from New Hampshire to California to support efforts to improve awareness and understanding of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), the nation's fourth leading cause of death.

May 20, 2009
NHLBI's First Grants Supported by American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Will Study Lung Diseases
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health announced that it will award 22 grants totaling $3.3 million in funds provided from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to focus additional research on two common, yet complex and difficult-to-treat lung diseases.

April 8, 2009
Acid Reflux without Symptoms Does Not Worsen Asthma
A commonly used treatment for acid reflux does not improve asthma symptoms or control in patients who do not have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER), according to a new study supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health and by the American Lung Association (ALA).

December 15, 2008
NIH Expands Open-Access Dataset of Genetic and Clinical Data to Include Asthma
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health has expanded its collection of genetic and clinical data first made freely available to researchers worldwide last year, to include clinical and genetic information collected from three asthma research networks.

November 13, 2008
New Survey Suggests Growing Awareness of COPD, Nation's Fourth Leading Killer
Awareness of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is growing, but few Americans have a thorough understanding of the disease, according to a new national survey released today. The new data show that 64 percent of survey respondents had heard of COPD, compared with 49 percent in a 2004 survey.

May 6, 2008
Statement from Elizabeth G. Nabel, M.D., Director, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, on World Asthma Day May 6, 2008
On this World Asthma Day, we at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), parts of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), stand side-by-side with scientists, policymakers, patient advocates, health care providers, and patients across the country to renew our dedication to understanding the causes of asthma, finding better treatments and promoting better asthma control.

April 9, 2008
Gene Linked to Inherited Blood Biomarker Associated with Asthma Risk
Risk for developing asthma is linked to variants in a gene called CHI3L1, which can be measured by checking levels of an inherited blood protein regulated by that gene, according to new research sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.

November 8, 2007
Statement from Elizabeth G. Nabel, M.D., Director, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, on COPD Awareness Month, November 2007
COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), a serious lung disease, is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. An American dies every 4.5 minutes from COPD. While there are 12 million people with a diagnosis of COPD, there may be another 12 million who have it and don't know it.

August 29, 2007
National Asthma Guidelines Updated
The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) today issued the first comprehensive update in a decade of clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. The guidelines emphasize the importance of asthma control and introduce new approaches for monitoring asthma.

January 23, 2007
Media Availability: Inhaled Steroids Best Treatment for Children with Asthma
Although several medications are available to help children maintain asthma control, clinical trials directly comparing them have not been conducted. In fact, current recommendations in national and international asthma guidelines are based either on studies of single treatments compared to a placebo in children or on comparison studies in adults.

January 18, 2007
NIH Launches New Campaign Aimed at Increasing Awareness, Early Diagnosis and Treatment of COPD
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health, in partnership with leading professional societies, health, and advocacy organizations today launches COPD Learn More Breathe Better, a national campaign designed to improve awareness among those at greatest risk for the disease.

November 20, 2006
NHLBI and CMS Launch Large Study of Home Oxygen Therapy for COPD
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) are launching the largest randomized clinical trial of the effectiveness and safety of long-term, home oxygen therapy for COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

January 18, 2006
Media Availability: Treatment Shows Long-term Benefits for Cystic Fibrosis Patients
New research suggests that inhaling hypertonic saline, a water-based concentrated salt solution, could provide long-term benefits for lung health in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF).

April 13, 2005
NHLBI Study Suggests Symptom-driven Therapy May Be Sufficient For Some Adults With Mild Persistent Asthma
Some adults with mild persistent asthma may be able to adequately control their asthma by taking corticosteroids only when needed, instead of taking anti-inflammatory medication daily, according to new results from the Improving Asthma Control Trial (IMPACT).

October 22, 2004
Genetics Play Role in Response to Most Common Asthma Drug
Researchers in the Asthma Clinical Research Network (ACRN) of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, found that over time, how participants responded to daily doses of inhaled albuterol differed depending on which form of a specific gene they had inherited.

June 13, 2003
National Asthma Conference June 19-21 on Advances in Prevention and Control
The nation's leading asthma clinicians, researchers, and public health experts will present the latest scientific advances in asthma prevention and control at a national conference June 19-21 at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. Conference highlights include reports on novel approaches for treating asthma attacks, environmental triggers of asthma attacks, the health effects of outdoor air pollution, innovative and effective community programs, and creative ways to educate patients.

May 20, 2003
Landmark Cooperative Federal Study Defines the Role of Lung Surgery in the Treatment of Severe Emphysema
Results of the largest study of bilateral lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) to treat severe emphysema indicate that, on average, patients who undergo LVRS with medical therapy are more likely to function better after two years and do not face an increased risk of death compared to those who receive medical therapy only.

October 30, 2002
NHLBI Funds Centers for Reducing Asthma Disparities
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) has created a new program to accelerate research aimed at understanding why certain racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups are more severely affected by asthma than other populations and at determining ways to close the gaps in prevalence and treatment of this common chronic disease.

June 10, 2002
Update on National Asthma Guidelines Released
The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP), has issued an update of selected topics in the Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. The guidelines now recommend inhaled corticosteroids as safe, effective and preferred first-line therapy for children as well as adults with persistent asthma.

May 22, 2001
NHLBI Researchers Find Long-acting Beta-agonists Not as Effective as Inhaled Corticosteroids in Treating Persistent Asthma
Researchers supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) today report findings from two studies that address an ongoing controversy about whether long-acting beta-agonists (LABs) should replace or supplement inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in the treatment of adults with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma.

May 3, 2001
NHLBI Reports New Asthma Data for World Asthma Day 2001
In observance of the third annual World Asthma Day, May 3, 2001, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) at the National Institutes of Health today reported that asthma continues to be a major public health problem in the U.S., but more organizations at both the national and community levels are joining together to combat it.

January 18, 2000
New Web Site Provides Access to Information on Sleep and Sleep Disorders
Ever wonder why you sleep, or why you don't do your best when you don't get enough sleep?

March 15, 1999
NHLBI Clinical Trial Stopped Early: Successful Ventilator Strategy Found for Intensive Care Patients on Life Support
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health today announced that a large clinical trial of mechanical ventilator use for intensive care patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) has been stopped early.

December 11, 1998
Global Plan Launched To Cut Childhood Asthma Deaths by 50%
In Barcelona, Spain today at the World Asthma Meeting, international experts in asthma management called for global action to reduce childhood asthma deaths by 50%. The five-year effort, announced on the eve of the first ever World Asthma Day (December 11), aims to significantly reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with this disease.

December 11, 1998
Asthma Management Website Announced by NHLBI
Physicians who want to provide the most up-to-date diagnostic and treatment methods for their asthma patients can now find, on one online site, virtually all the scientific literature on chronic asthma that has ever been published.

June 1, 1997
NHLBI Researchers Reverse Emphysema in Lab Animals
Scientists supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) have shown, for the first time, that retinoic acid, a derivative of Vitamin A, reverses emphysema in the lungs of laboratory rats.

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Last Updated: April 12, 2012