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Dr. Kaltman In The News

February 19, 2014 : Vanderbilt University
Baby hearts need rhythm to develop correctly
David Salisbury
To develop correctly, baby hearts need rhythm even before they have blood to pump, according to results of a partially NHLBI-supported study at Vanderbilt University.

January 9, 2014 : Popular Science
A glue that seals heart defects
Francie Diep
The glue—which NHLBI-supported researchers showed is able to hold fast on live beating hearts—could be a gentler alternative to stitches.

December 13, 2013 : PRNewswire
2014 Breakthrough Prizes awarded in fundamental physics and life sciences for a total of $21 million
NHLBI grantee Dr. Richard Lifton from Yale University was awarded the 2014 Breakthrough Prize for the discovery of genes and biochemical mechanisms that cause hypertension. The award recognizes excellence in research aimed at curing intractable diseases and extending human life. The Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics and Life Sciences are founded by Sergey Brin and Anne Wojcicki, Jack Ma and Cathy Zhang, Yuri and Julia Milner and Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan.

Image of an ambulance

October 24, 2013
NIH and CDC launch registry for sudden death in the young
A registry of deaths in young people from conditions such as heart disease and epilepsy is being created to help researchers define the scope of the problem and set future research priorities. The National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are collaborating to create the Sudden Death in the Young Registry.

October 17, 2013 : Harvard Medical School
Silencing sudden death
Stephanie Dutchen
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)—a disease in which cardiac muscle thickens, weakening the heart—can be prevented from developing for several months in mice by reducing production of a mutant protein, according to a new study by NHLBI-supported researchers at Harvard Medical School.

On the left is a diagram of a normal heart and on the right is a diagram of a heart with increased thickness in the heart walls, a condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

September 3, 2013
Risk factors identified at diagnosis help predict outcomes for children with rare heart condition
A long-term study of children with a complex heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) found that risk factors identified at diagnosis help to predict outcomes for children with this rare condition.

September 3, 2013 : University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Lancet study outlines first risk calculator for pediatric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
NHLBI-supported researchers at the University of Miami found that risk factors identified at diagnosis help predict outcomes for children with a complex heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). “Based on our experience with adults, we do not think of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as a cause for heart transplant. Yet for a select group of high-risk children with HCM, a heart transplant is key for survival,” said principal investigator Steven E. Lipshultz, M.D.

July 23, 2013 : University of Rochester Medical Center
URMC contributes to landmark study on origins of congenital heart disease
In a first-of-its-kind study published in the journal Nature, scientists identified a group of gene mutations that may be behind up to 10 percent of complex congenital heart defects, the most frequent birth defect and a leading cause of infant death.

May 20, 2013 : NIH Research Matters
Clues to congenital heart disease
Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
This NIH Research Matters article highlights the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease, an NHLBI-supported international, multicenter collaborative research effort that brings us closer to understanding the most common type of birth defect.

May 12, 2013
NIH Media Availability: Researchers take important step in unlocking what causes congenital heart disease
Findings from the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease bring us closer to understanding this most common type of birth defect.

May 12, 2013 : Wall Street Journal
New mutations tied to kids' heart ills
Ron Winslow
This article highlights a landmark NHLBI-supported research initiative, which found that congenital heart defects are linked to spontaneous mutations. These findings bring us closer to understanding this most common type of birth defect. "You don't know what possible therapies are available until you get a better understanding of what's going on at a fundamental level," said Dr. Jonathan Kaltman, chief of NHLBI’s Heart Development and Structural Diseases Branch, and a co-author of the study. (subscription required)

October 1, 2012 : Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Five articles regarding the Pediatric Heart Network's Single Ventricle Reconstruction Trial
Coauthors include Mario Stylianou, Ph.D., Jonathan R. Kaltman, M.D., and Gail D. Pearson, M.D., Sc.D., NHLBI
The Single Ventricle Reconstruction (SVR) trial was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) as part of the NHLBI-funded Pediatric Heart Network.

July 10, 2012 : Pediatrics
Economic evaluation of strategies to reduce sudden cardiac death in young athletes
Co-authored by Jonathan Kaltman, M.D., Division of Cardiovascular Sciences
Kaltman and colleagues evaluate the cost-effectiveness of adding electrocardiogram (ECG) screening to the currently standard practice of pre-participation history and physical examination to reduce sudden cardiac death in young athletes.

July 25, 2011
NIH Media Availability: Study finds important risk factors for death and transplantation in children with heart muscle disease
Researchers have identified important risk factors for death and transplantation in children with dilated cardiomyopathy (heart muscle disease), according to results from a study supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.

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Last Updated: April 20, 2012