NATIONAL CENTER ON SLEEP DISORDERS RESEARCH NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE

Sleep Disorders Advisory Board Meeting Minutes

February 25 and 26, 2013


TABLE OF CONTENTS

ATTENDEES
INTRODUCTION
ADOPTION OF MINUTES FROM THE May 30, 2012 MEETING, Chair
NCSDR DIRECTOR'S REPORT, Michael Twery, PhD
NIH SLEEP DISORDERS RESEARCH PLAN, ANNUAL UPDATE
HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020, SLEEP HEALTH INTERIM PROGRESS

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020, ADOLESCENT HEALTH AND SLEEP, Dr. Trina Anglin (HRSA)

TRANS-NIH INSTITUTE, CENTER AND OFFICE UPDATES
CDC UPDATE, Dr. Anne Wheaton (CDC)
SRS/AASM RESEARCH TASK FORCE UPDATE, Dr. Phyllis Zee
Presentation: National Sleep Foundation (NSF), Dr. Max Hirshkowitz

Discussion of Research Translation focused on following ideas:
FMCSA/DOT, UPDATE, Ms. Terri Hallquist

PUBLIC COMMENTS AND DISCUSSION

DAY ONE SUMMARY, Dr. Sairam Parthasarathy

SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION: GENETIC NETWORKS UNDERLYING SLEEP AND ENVIRONMENTAL INTERACTIONS, Dr. Susan Harbison (NHLBI)
HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020, EARLY CHILDHOOD AND SLEEP, Dr. Angelika Claussen
COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC
PLANNING, DISCUSSION FOLLOW-UP, AND SUMMARY
FUTURE MEETINGS

CERTIFICATION


NCSDR Home Page

Sleep Disorders Research Advisory Board Page


BOARD MEMBERS PRESENT

Dr. Sairam Parthasarathy, Chair
Dr. Mercedes Carnethon
Dr. Julie Flygare
Dr. Girardin Jean-Louis
Dr. Leszek Kubin
Ms. Kathy Page
Dr. Ila Sensenich
Dr. Catherine Vena
Mr. Gagandeep Walia
Dr. Michael Twery, NHLBI, Executive Secretary

BOARD MEMBERS ABSENT

None

FEDERAL EMPLOYEES

Dr. Lee Alekel, NCCAM, NIH
Dr. Trina Anglin, HRSA, HHS
Dr. Beth Ansel, NICHD, NIH
Dr. Rosemarie Filart, NCATS, NIH
Mr. Peyvand Ghofrani, NHLBI, NIH
Dr. Harold Gordon, NIDA, NIH
Dr. Lindsey Grandison, NIAAA, NIH
Ms. Terri Hallquist, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, DOT
Dr. Lynne Haverkos, NICHD, NIH
Dr. Yejun He, NINDS, NIH
Dr. Todd Horowitz, NCI, NIH
Dr. Rosalind King, NICHD, NIH
Dr. Aaron Laposky, NHLBI, NIH
Dr. Mack Mackiewicz, NIA, NIH
Dr. Ann O’Mara, NCI, NIH
Dr. Roger Rosa, NIOSH, CDC
Dr. Nancy Shinowara, NICHD, NIH
Dr. Corinne Silva, NIDDK, NIH
Dr. Barbara Sorkin, ODS, NIH
Dr. Kate Stoney, NHLBI, NIH
Dr. Phil Tonkins, NIAMS, NIH
Dr. Aleksandra Vicentic, NIMH, NIH
Dr. Anne Wheaton, CDC

MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC

Mr. Dale Dirks, SRS
Dr. Edward Grandi, ASAA
Dr. Max Hirshkowitz, NSF
Mr. Thomas Johnsrud, AASMMs. Kristin Jones, NSF
Mr. Peter Mansbach, CSDN
Dr. Madhvi Upender
Dr. Phyllis Zee, SRS

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INTRODUCTION, Michael Twery, PhD

  • The meeting was called into session at 8:30 am, [FR Doc. 2013-00269].
  • The Sleep Disorders Research Advisory Board (SDRAB) is a Federal Advisory Committee established by the NIH Revitalization Act of 1993 (42 USC Sec. 285b-7).
  • Members of the Board were informed of their status as special government employees during the meeting and that conflict of interest guidelines apply. Members will recuse themselves from discussions presenting any appearance of potential conflict.

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ADOPTION OF MINUTES FROM THE May 30, 2012 SDRAB MEETING, Chair

  • The minutes of the previous meeting on May 30, 2012 was unanimously approved by the Board without amendment.

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NCSDR DIRECTOR'S REPORT, Michael Twery, PhD

  • Sleep research is supported across the NIH.
  • NIH Research Map reveals potential directions for cross-disciplinary research.
  • Representative examples of new research training awards presented.
  • Summary of activities including sleep/circadian initiatives across the NIH, seminars, workshops and scientific conferences, invited lectures and presentations.
  • Major NHLBI funded sleep research grants were highlighted including Hispanic Community Health Study, nuMoM2b, and ROSTERS resident shift clinical trial.
  • Selected future research directions were highlighted including biomarkers of sleep health; circadian mechanisms of HLB diseases; early clinical trial pilot studies on sleep disorders; and educational research in sleep health and sleep-circadian biology (R25).
  • Selected public dissemination activities where highlighted including collaboration for transNIH NIH Radio podcasts.

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NIH SLEEP DISORDERS RESEARCH PLAN, ANNUAL UPDATE, Dr. Michael Twery

  • Overarching goals of the 2011 Sleep Disorders Research Plan were reviewed.
  • 2012 trans-NIH grant portfolio update showed distribution of grants across basic, clinical, sleep medicine, translational, and research training categories.
  • Using FY11 as baseline, the percentage of grants funded in 2012 increased under each goal area, but especially in sleep medicine and research training.
  • Percentage increases in FY2012 training and career awards are substantial, but overall numbers are still small. Future momentum hinges on the research community.
  • The analysis indicates that sleep research plan goals are well supported NIH wide.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020, SLEEP HEALTH INTERIM PROGRESS, Dr. Michael Twery

  • Recent data from HP2020 objectives were provided, and strategy for recognizing “Sleep Health” in the Nation’s Health Agenda was described.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020, ADOLESCENT HEALTH AND SLEEP, Dr. Trina Anglin (HRSA)

  • Update and rationale for adolescent health objectives in HP2020 including sleep.
  • Objective SH-3 is to increase proportion of students who get sufficient sleep. This is an existing HP2020 objective, with 2009 baseline data.
  • “Increase the percentage of public middle and senior high schools that start class after 8:30 am” is being considered as a new objective.

TRANS-NIH INSTITUTE, CENTER AND OFFICE UPDATES

  • Trans-NIH program representatives presented updates of sleep and circadian activities.
  • NIAAA Dr. Grandison summarized interest on the association between alcohol dependence and insomnia, and mechanisms coupling circadian rhythms to reward circuitry; provided an overview of sleep/circadian grant portfolio; and described recent PA-12-178 FOA (Alcohol Abuse, Sleep Disorders & Circadian Rhythms.
  • NCI Dr. O’Mara described interests on interactions between sleep, cancer risk, and treatment. Behavioral interventions and animal models are needed.
  • NIMH Dr. Vicentic described interest in sleep interactions with neural functions (emotion, executive function), mechanisms linking sleep microstructure and neural plasticity, PTSD, and emotional regulation.
  • NINDS Dr. He noted that Dr. Gnadt is interim sleep program officer while the search is underway for Dr. Mitlers replacement. Topics include CNS and glycemic regulation, and the emerging plans for a Brain Activity Map.
  • NIA Dr. Mackiewicz described recent funding for sleep/circadian research, the Neurotherapeutics Network, and a 2012 workshop on epigenetics and circadian clock.
  • ODS Dr. Sorkin described co-funding activities related to use and safety of dietary supplements; interest in sleep, fatigue, and alertness. A workshop is planned on energy drinks/stimulant use and their biological effects.
  • NIDDK Dr. Silva noted that support for research on rhythms and metabolism continues to gain momentum. Interests include lipid, carbohydrate metabolism and endocrine organ functions (e.g. liver, pancreas, adipose tissue). Recent initiatives with sleep and rhythms include PAR-13-109 (Mechanistic Insights from Birth Cohorts); and LIFEMoms weight interventions in pregnant women with sleep questions and actigraphy.
  • NIDA Dr. Gordon indicated interest in mechanisms of drug abuse related to sleep/circadian biology.
  • NICHD Dr. King noted recent organizational changes included a new Pediatric Trauma and Critical Illness branch, which is interested in sleep research. Selected highlights include PA-13-118 (Mechanisms, Models, Measurement, & Management in Pain Research); ongoing nuMoM2b cohort study; PASS Network; NICHD exchange program (internal seminar series); and Safe to Sleep public education campaign.
  • NIOSH Dr. Rosa described interests including industry-sector programs on drowsy driving and shift-work training module directed toward nursing.

CDC UPDATE, Dr. Anne Wheaton (CDC)

  • CDC sleep data resources were highlighted including Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Youth Behavior Risk Survey, National Health Interview Survey, and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
  • Recent findings/publications include an MMWR report on drowsy driving).
  • Research gaps and challenges include: (a) interventions on changing school start times (b) impact of sleep interventions on improving mental health (c) industry interventions to improve health of shift workers (d) policy changes and worksite interventions to prevent drowsy driving.

SRS/AASM RESEARCH TASK FORCE UPDATE, Dr. Phyllis Zee

  • Highlights from the SRS/AASM task force meeting in February, 2013 were presented. Task force intends to produce a white paper and recommendations by June 2013.

FOCUS ON SCIENTIFIC TRANSLATION, Dr. Sairam Parthasarathy

Presentation: National Sleep Foundation (NSF), Dr. Max Hirshkowitz

  • Relationship of NSF objectives to the Sleep Research Plan was highlighted.
  • Sleep Awareness Week (March 3-10) and next Sleep in America Poll noted.
  • Potential for coordination of dissemination and implementation activities.

Discussion of Research Translation focused on following ideas:

  • Discussion highlighted the uncertain status of medical consensus on sleep need and the therapeutic goals in treating sleep disorders.
  • Opportunities to apply sleep/circadian research to medical practice were identified.
  • Markers of sleep need could potentially facilitate advances in medical practice.
  • Research may also be needed on public/community priorities, community engagement, and the balance of patient needs and research priorities.
  • Another viewpoint was on the role of health messages (e.g. sleeping is ‘cool’).
  • Integrated medical approaches appear needed.

FMCSA/DOT, UPDATE, Ms. Terri Hallquist

  • Data on driver fatigue indicate a serious public health problem.
  • Potential areas for research coordination include: development of improved technologies to detect sleepiness; development of non-invasive drowsy driving monitoring system to alert drivers they are sleepy; biomarkers to identify individuals vulnerable to fatigue.

PUBLIC COMMENTS AND DISCUSSION

  • American Sleep Apnea Association, Mr. Grandi. The ASAA has a newly appointed Chair (Mr. Adam Amdur) and Chief Medical Officer (Dr. Judy Owens). ASAA organized the 2012 Economic and Clinical Consequences of Sleep Apnea conference. ASAA supports various websites for community education and for re-cycling of CPAP devices; Sleep is a non-communicable disease with implications for world health.
  • Circadian Sleep Disorders Network, Mr. Mansbach. He noted that circadian sleep disorders are not listed on NIH webpages and encourage that these disorders be added to the appropriate NIH web pages. Recent findings linking sleep and circadian disruption to adverse health outcomes were highlighted.

DAY ONE SUMMARY, Dr. Sairam Parthasarathy

  • Need for research to define normative values of sleep, elucidate the consequences of sleep deficiency, and determine association between variation in sleep phenotypes and outcomes (e.g. quality of life, cardiovascular disease and risk, mental health, memory and cognition, daytime sleepiness, performance).
  • Need to improve models of care delivery in sleep medicine.
  • Prioritize areas that need more development and focus, based on the update of NIH grants in relation to Sleep Research Plan goals.

SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION: GENETIC NETWORKS UNDERLYING SLEEP AND ENVIRONMENTAL INTERACTIONS, Dr. Susan Harbison (NHLBI)

  • Dr. Harbison presented data from her NHLBI intramural research on sleep gene.

HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020, EARLY CHILDHOOD AND SLEEP, Dr. Angelika Claussen

  • Proposed objective would assess the proportion of children that have poor quality of sleep. Input is needed on the measures to use and an existing data sources.
  • Question(s) and data sources with value as a national health objective are needed.

COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC

  • Wake Up Narcolepsy, Inc. update
  • Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation update
  • Discussion ensued on the question of how to empower patients? Negative public perception about sleep disorders may discourage medical treatment.
  • AASM update
  • Discussion ensued over whether sufficient consensus on sleep disorders has been reached to move toward dissemination research and health campaigns.

PLANNING, DISCUSSION FOLLOW-UP, AND SUMMARY

  • Proposed that the next regularly scheduled SDRAB meeting (February or March 2014) continue the discussion of research translation and dissemination.
  • Demonstration of NIH Reporter requested.

FUTURE MEETINGS

  • The next regular in-person SDRAB meeting is expected in February or March 2014.

CERTIFICATION

I hereby certify that the foregoing minutes are accurate and complete.


Sairam Parthasarathy, MD
Chair

Michael Twery, PhD
Executive Secretary

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Last Updated October 2013




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