Healthy Heart, Healthy Family: A Community Health Worker's Manual for the Filipino Community

Manual Contents

Session 8 Welcome Heart Healthy Eating Into Your Home

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Objectives

By the end of this session, group members will:

  • How to plan and prepare traditional Filipino meals in a heart healthy way
  • How to choose foods for a heart healthy eating plan

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Materials and Supplies

To conduct this session, you will need:

  • “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family” manual and picture cards
  • Set of measuring cups (1 cup, ½ cup, ¼ cup)
  • Blackboard and chalk or several large pieces of paper, a marker, and tape
  • Enough pairs of scissors and glue sticks for group members to use during the activity

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Handouts

Give each group member these handouts during this session:

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Introducing the Session

  1. Welcome
  2. Review of Last Week's Session
  3. About This Session
  1. Welcome
    • Welcome group members to the session.
  2. Review of Last Week’s Session
    • Say:
      At the last session, we talked about what you need to know about diabetes.
    • Ask these questions, and review the answers with group members.
      • What is diabetes?
        • Diabetes results when the body does not make enough insulin or cannot make it well, causing glucose (sugar) to build up in the blood. As a result, the body does not function well.
      • What are risk factors for diabetes?
        • Overweight
        • Family members with diabetes
        • Not having a physically active lifestyle
        • Being Latino, African American, American Indian, Asian American, or Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
        • History of gestational diabetes or having given birth to at least one baby weighing 9 pounds (4.1 kg) or more
        • High blood pressure
        • Cholesterol levels are not normal: HDL cholesterol is low, or triglycerides are high
      • What are the ABCs of diabetes control?
        • A is for the A1C test. This simple lab test reflects a person’s average blood glucose level over the previous 3 months. The A1C number to aim for is below seven.
        • B is for blood pressure. The higher your blood pressure, the harder your heart has to work. High blood pressure increases your risk for a heart attack, stroke, and damage to your kidneys and eyes. Your blood pressure should be below 130/80 mmHg (millimeters of mercury).
        • C is for cholesterol. Keep cholesterol at normal levels. Bad cholesterol, or LDL, can build up and clog your arteries. It can lead to a heart attack or stroke. People with type 2 diabetes need to keep their LDL cholesterol below 100 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter).
      • How does diabetes affect your body?
        • Diabetes can cause damage to the heart, brain, kidneys, and eyes. It can cause nerve damage, which reduces feeling in your feet. Diabetes can also affect blood flow in your legs and feet. This can lead to sores that don’t heal and amputation.
    • Say:
      At the end of the last session, you made a pledge to do something to help you prevent or control diabetes. What problems did you have? How did you deal with any problems?
      Note: Allow 2 minutes for group member to respond.
  3. About This Session
    • Say:
      In this session, you will learn that what you choose to eat can make a difference in your heart health. With the help of Lola’s family, you will learn how to:
      • Choose a variety of foods for heart health.
      • Identify serving sizes and the number of recommended servings for each food group.
    • Say:
      • Lola Idad encourages her family to make these heart healthy changes together. She often says, “Ang mabigat ay gumagaan, kung pinagtutulungan.” “A heavy burden is lightened if everyone participates in carrying it.”
      • The de la Cruz family members support one another as they learn how to welcome heart healthy eating into their home.

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Conducting the Session

  1. Eat a Variety of Heart Healthy Foods
  2. The Traditional Filipino Diet
  3. A Heart Healthy Eating Plan for Filipino Families
  4. How To Choose Heart Healthy Foods
  5. (Optional) Heart Healthy Scenarios With the de la Cruz Family
  6. Ampalaya (Bitter Melon) With Pork Recipe
  7. Cooking With Children
  1. Eat a Variety of Heart Healthy Foods
    • Ask:
      Why is it important to eat a variety of heart healthy foods?
      Note: Allow about 5 minutes for group members to respond. Write their answers on the blackboard or on a large piece of paper taped to the wall.
    • Add the answers below if the group members do not say them.
      • Eating a variety of foods that are lower in saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, salt and sodium, added sugar, and calories can help you have a healthy heart.
      • One food cannot provide all the nutrients your body needs in the amounts that it needs them.

    More Information: Nutrients in the foods we eat include

    • Carbohydrates
    • Protein
    • Fats
    • Fiber
    • Vitamins
    • Minerals
  2. The Traditional Filipino Diet
    • Note: This session will help group members think about the foods they eat. Some of their favorite traditional Filipino foods are very nutritious. Other dishes can be prepared in more heart healthy ways.
    • Ask:
      What are some traditional Filipino foods?
      Note: Allow 5 minutes for group members to respond. Write their answers on the blackboard or on a large piece of paper taped to the wall.
    • Say:
      Many traditional Filipino foods are heart healthy for you and your family. These include:
      • Steamed rice, white or brown
      • Beans, such as mung beans, black beans, and string beans
      • Fruits, such as mango
      • Fish and seafood, such as milkfish (bangus), grouper (lapu-lapu), shrimp (hipon), mackerel (galunggong), mussels (tahong), clams (tulya), large and small crabs (alimango and alimasag), and squid (pusit)
    • Say:
      Rice is a very important part of the Filipino diet. Rice and fish, together, are a good source of protein. But we need to be careful about the way we prepare them.
    • Say:
      Some Filipinos have adopted cooking and eating habits that can lead to health problems such as heart disease. What are some examples of these habits?
      Note: Allow about 3 minutes for group members to answer. Add these habits if they are not mentioned:
      • Cooking foods with too much saturated fat, such as lard and shortening, as well as coconut oil and palm oil
      • Eating fried foods often, such as longanisa (native sausage), fried lumpia (egg roll), sinangag (garlic fried rice), and fried meat and vegetables
      • Eating foods higher in saturated fat, such as fatty meats, canned and processed meat, high-fat cheeses and creams, whole milk, banana chips, and other chips
      • Eating foods that are higher in calories, such as bibingka or ginataan (desserts that contain coconut milk), candies, and chocolate
      • Drinking high-calorie beverages such as regular soft drinks
      • Eating fewer fruits and vegetables
      • Eating meats high in saturated fat instead of lean meats
      • Eating foods high in trans fat such as cookies, crackers, doughnuts, baked goods, and french fries
      • Eating sauces high in sodium, such as soy sauce, bagoong (salted fish paste) and patis (fish sauce).
  3. A Heart Healthy Eating Plan for Filipino Families
    • Say:
      We can take steps to improve the way we eat and still enjoy our traditional foods. The first step is to learn which foods we should eat more often. The second step is to learn the amounts of these foods that we should eat each day.
    • Show picture card 8.1. (Keep it in view throughout this activity.)
    • Say:
      This heart healthy eating plan shows us the types of foods we can choose for better health.
    • Give group members the “Heart Healthy Eating Plan” handout.
    • Say:
      The food choices you make each day affect your health. We will talk about ways to choose healthy foods from the food groups in the heart healthy eating plan.
      • Grains (6 to 8 servings a day)
        Say
        • Make at least half of your grains whole grains. Eat at least three servings of whole-grain cereals, breads, rice, or noodles (pasta) every day. Remember, one ounce of grains is a serving. In general, 1 ounce of grains is one slice of bread, about 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal, or ½ cup of steamed rice, cooked noodles, or cooked cereal.
        • Look at the Nutrition Facts label, and choose grain products that have whole grains as the first ingredient. Some examples of whole-grain ingredients are whole wheat, whole oats, oatmeal, and whole rye.
        • For a change, try brown rice or whole-wheat noodles instead of white rice or noodles.
        • Snack on ready-to-eat, whole-grain cereal such as toasted oat cereal. Also try popcorn with little or no salt or butter as a snack.
      • Vegetables (4 to 5 servings a day)
        Say:
        • Eat more dark green vegetables, such as bok choy (pechay), broccoli, spinach, and other dark leafy greens.
        • Eat more orange vegetables, such as carrots and sweet potatoes (camote).
        • Stock up on frozen vegetables for quick and easy cooking in the microwave.
        • Buy fresh vegetables in season. They cost less and are likely to be at their peak flavor.
        • Plan some meals around a vegetable main dish, such as vegetable stirfry or soup.
        • Choose no-salt-added canned vegetables.
      • Fruits (4 to 5 servings a day)
        Say:
        • Choose fresh, frozen, canned, or dried fruit.
        • Limit fruit juices, because they contain a lot of calories and sugar. Try choosing whole fruit instead of juice most of the time.
        • Keep a bowl of whole fruit on the table or counter or in the refrigerator.
      • Fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products (2 to 3 servings a day)
        Say:
        • Get your calcium-rich foods.
        • Choose fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt, and other milk products.
        • If you usually use whole milk, switch gradually to fat-free milk. Try reduced-fat (2%) milk, then low-fat (1%) milk, then fat-free milk.
        • Have a fat-free or low-fat yogurt for a snack.
        • If you are lactose intolerant, try lactose-free products, such as yogurt, cheese, or lactose-free milk.
      • Lean meats, poultry, and fish (2 or fewer 3-ounce servings a day)
        Say:
        • Choose low-fat or lean meats and poultry. Select meat cuts that are low in fat and ground beef that is extra lean.
        • Eat a variety of foods with protein. Choose more fish, seafood, and tofu.
        • Choose lean chicken, roast beef, or ham, instead of fatty lunch meats, such as regular bologna or salami.
        • Bake, broil, or grill meat.
      • Nuts, seeds, and legumes (4 to 5 servings a week)
        Say:
        Choose cooked and dry beans, nuts, seeds, and peas for rich sources of protein and fiber.
      • Fats and oils
        Say:
        • Get most of your fat from food sources, such as fish and seafood, nuts, and vegetable oils.
        • Limit solid fats and oils such as butter, stick margarine, shortening, lard, coconut oil, and palm oil, as well as foods that contain these fats.
      • Sweets and added sugars (5 or fewer servings a week)
        • Say:
          • Choose foods and beverages that are low in calories and added sugar. Use the Nutrition Facts label to compare the calorie and sugar content of foods and beverages.
          • Choose water, fat-free milk, or other unsweetened beverages most often.
          • Select unsweetened cereal and add a noncalorie sweetener or fruit.
        • Ask these questions, and hold up the correct measuring cup for each answer.
          • What is one serving of a cooked vegetable?
            ½ cup
          • How much milk or yogurt is considered one serving?
            1 cup
          • How much cheese is considered one serving?
            1.5 to 2 ounces
          • Can you give an example of a 1-ounce serving from the grains group?
            1-ounce servings from the grains group include:
            • ½ cup of steamed rice or noodles
            • One slice of bread
            • About 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal or ½ cup of cooked cereal, such as oatmeal
          • What counts as one serving of fruit?
            • One medium apple, banana, or orange
            • 1 medium apple, banana, or orange
            • ½ cup of raw or canned fruit or 100% fruit juice
            • ¼ cup dried fruit
      • Say Yes to Fruits and Vegetables Activity
        • Divide participants into small groups of three to four people.
        • Give every small group the “Add Color and Flavor to Your Menu” handout and the “Say Yes to Fruits and Vegetables” handout.
        • Give each group a pair of scissors and a glue stick, so they can cut out and paste the pictures.
        • Say:
          Now let’s do the “Say Yes to Fruits and Vegetables” activity to learn how to add fruits and vegetables to your meals.
        • Say:
          For this activity, cut out the pictures of fruits and vegetables on the handout that I gave you. Cut out the fruits and vegetables that you want to add to your breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack. Then paste your fruit and vegetable choices in the correct spaces on each menu.
          Note: Allow 10 minutes for group members to complete their meals.
        • Ask each group member to say what fruits and vegetables they added to their meals.
        • Then, ask the rest of the group members if they have any other suggestions.
        • Say:
          Great job! Now you know how easy and fun it can be to add fruits and vegetables to your meals.
  4. How To Choose Heart Healthy Foods
    • Say:
      We are going to do another group activity. During this activity, we will learn how to make better food choices.
    • Note: Write Rose’s breakfast on the blackboard or on a large piece of paper taped to the wall. Fill in the Rose’s Breakfast and Portion Size columns. Leave the Food Group and Better Choices columns blank. (Optional) Repeat the game with the lunch and dinner meals.
      Breakfast
      Rose's Breakfast Food Group(s)
      (leave blank for activity)
      Portion Size Better Choices
      (leave blank for activity)
      Fried egg Meats and beans 1 egg Boiled or poached egg, ½ cup egg substitute, or 2 egg whites. Scramble eggs with vegetable oil spray instead of using fat.
      Bacon Meats and beans 3 strips Leftover grilled chicken, 3 ounces; or Canadian bacon, 2 strips
      Fried rice (with egg, green onions, garlic, butter, sausage) Grains, meats and beans, vegetables, fats and oils ½ Plain, steamed white or brown rice, ½ cup
      Mango nectar drink Fruit ½ cup Pineapple juice or fresh mango, ½ cup
      Coffee with condensed milk Milk 1 cup of coffee, 1 tablespoon of milk Coffee with fat-free milk (or 1 tablespoon of evaporated fat-free milk)
    • Ask:
      To which group does each food belong? What changes would make Rose’s breakfast more heart healthy?
    • Write the suggestions beside the foods they are replacing on the blackboard or on a large piece of paper taped to the wall. Fill in the correct answers for any items not mentioned by group members.
    • (Optional meals: lunch and dinner)
      Lunch
      Rose's Lunch Food Group(s)
      (leave blank for activity)
      Portion Size Better Choices
      (leave blank for activity)
      Large cheeseburger with mayonnaise Meats and beans, grains, milk, vegetables, fats and oils 1 large cheeseburger Leftover shrimp; steamed vegetables, ½ cup
      Super-size french fries Vegetables, fats and oils 1 large (6 ounces) serving of fries Steamed white or brown rice, ½ cup
      Apple pie Fruits, grains, fats and oils, sweets and added sugars 1 large (2.7 ounce) serving Fresh papaya, ½ slice
      Vanilla milkshake Milk, sweets and added sugars 1 milkshake, 32 ounces Fat-free or low-fat milk, or lactose-free milk
      Dinner
      Rose's Dinner Food Group(s)
      (leave blank for activity)
      Portion Size Better Choices
      (leave blank for activity)
      Fried lumpia Meats and beans, fats and oils 3 fried lumpia 1 Fresh lumpia
      Fried chicken with fried rice Meats and beans, grains, fats and oils 2 pieces of chicken, 1 ½ cups fried rice Pancit with shrimp and lean pork (1 ounce cooked)
      Large soft drink Sweets and added sugars 1 cup Water, diet soft drink, soy milk (1 cup), or fruit juice (½ cup)
      Flan Fats and oils, milk, sweets and added sugars, meat and beans 1 slice Fresh fruit cup (½ cup) or low-fat frozen yogurt
    • Ask:
      What are some ways to eat less saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, and calories?
    • Add the following answers if they are not mentioned:
      • When shopping:
        • Choose a variety of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.
        • Choose low-fat or fat-free milk products, salad dressings, and mayonnaise.
        • Choose lean cuts of meat. Trim away extra fat.
        • Read Nutrition Facts labels to choose foods lower in saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, sugar, and calories.
      • When cooking:
        • Use vegetable oil or soft tub margarine instead of butter, lard, or coconut oil.
        • Cook using low-fat methods, such as baking, steaming, broiling, or grilling (without added fat), rather than frying.
      • When eating:
        • Eat foods that are low in saturated fat, trans fat, and added sugars.
        • Remove skin from poultry. Throw away the skin, and do not eat it.
        • Choose low-fat or fat-free milk products, salad dressings, and mayonnaise.
        • Eat no more than four egg yolks each week.
        • Eat fewer high-calorie foods with little added nutritional value, such as high-fat lunch meats, pies, cakes, cookies, crackers, and chips. Drink fewer sodas.
        • Eat smaller portion sizes.
    • Say:
      There are creative ways to make healthier versions of Filipino foods that are traditionally high in fat and sodium. Experiment with your favorite recipes! For example, try using evaporated low-fat milk instead of cream when making leche flan.
    • Say:
      Thank you for participating in this activity! You did great! Now you can make healthier choices for you and your family.
  5. (Optional) Heart Healthy Scenarios With the de la Cruz Family: Group Activity
    Note: This activity will help group members think about ways they can help their relatives and friends make healthier food choices. You may select one or more scenarios to review.
    • Give group members the “Heart Healthy Scenarios With the de la Cruz Family” handout.
    • Divide group members into groups of 3-5 people, and give each group a different scenario (handout) to discuss.
    • Say:
      Each group will read the scenario on the handout and think about ways to solve the problems described. Please choose one member of your group to read the story and questions aloud to the group. Write down the group’s solutions to each of the questions.
      Note: Allow 5-7 minutes for group members to complete the activity.
    • Say:
      I would like one volunteer from each group to read the story and the answers to the questions aloud.
    • Note: After each volunteer reads the story and solutions, ask the entire group to share any other solutions.
    • Heart Healthy Scenarios With the de la Cruz Family
      • Scene 1: Helena’s Fast Food Dilemma
        Mila’s friend Helena is a busy, working mom with two children. She rarely makes dinner for her family because of her busy schedule. Helena takes her children to fast food restaurants three or four times a week. Her sons love eating hamburgers and french fries, drinking soda, and getting free toys. But she wants her children to live healthy lives. She is worried that they are spending too much time playing video games and watching television after school and meals. Combined with the fast food, Helena is worried that her sons will become overweight soon.
        Note: Add the following answers to each question if they are not mentioned.
        • What can Helena do on her busy schedule to feed her children healthy meals?
          • Helena could make meals in a slow cooker (Crock-Pot®) so they can cook during the day and be ready when she and her sons get home.
          • She could buy roasted chicken instead of hamburgers and fries at fast food restaurants.
          • She could buy steamed fish or vegetable dishes from a Chinese carryout restaurant.
        • What else can Helena do to help her children live healthy lives?
          • She could limit the time her children spend playing video games and watching television.
          • She could turn off Saturday morning cartoons and take her sons to a park or bike with them to the library instead.
          • She could encourage her children to play active outdoor games instead of video games.
          • When she does allow her children to watch TV, she could have them practice tai chi or play with a hula hoop at the same time.
      • Scene 2: Cesar’s and Mila’s Parties
        Cesar and Mila like to have parties at their house. They enjoy the company of their family and friends. They usually celebrate with a lot of food and drink. They love to make chicken, leaving the skin on, fried lumpia with pork, sinigang with a lot of patis, and sweet desserts. Their gatherings start in the afternoon and usually last through the evening. Most of the time, they are sitting down eating and drinking alcohol. At least once a week, Cesar and Mila’s friends take turns hosting parties at their houses.
        Note: Add the following answers to each question if they are not mentioned.
        • What can Cesar and Mila make for their own parties or bring to friends’ parties to make them more heart healthy?
          • Water, unsweetened tea, and diet soft drinks
          • Dishes of steamed fish or seafood, noodles or steamed rice, and vegetables
          • Fresh lumpia
          • Platters of sliced fresh fruit such as papaya, cantaloupe, pineapple, and mango.
          • Lower-fat desserts such as puto and mamon.
        • How can Cesar and Mila stick to their healthier eating plan when they are at the parties?
          • Eat smaller portions.
          • Do not take second helpings of high-calorie foods. Eat fresh fruit if you are still hungry.
          • Eat less food that is high in fat, such as fried foods.
          • Eat fewer foods that are high in sodium, such as chips and sauces.
          • Eat fewer foods that are high in fat and added sugar, such as desserts made with coconut milk, pastries, cookies, and chocolate.
        • What else can Cesar and Mila do?
          • Eat a healthy snack before the party so they are not hungry.
          • Take a walk after eating.
          • Limit their alcohol to one drink for Mila and two drinks for Cesar.
      • (Optional) Scene 3: Eating When Stressed or Bored
        Jose is trying to stay heart healthy. His doctor says he needs to lower his blood pressure and lose some weight. But eating makes him feel better when he is stressed or bored. He says it takes his mind off his problems. Even when he is not hungry, Jose likes to snack on pork rinds, salted peanuts, and regular sodas while watching television.
        Note: Add the following answers to each question if they are not mentioned.
        Note: Allow 5 minutes for open discussion.
        • How can Jose eat better to lose weight and lower his blood pressure?
          • Jose could make it a practice to eat only when he feels hungry.
          • He could eat fresh fruit or fat-free yogurt.
          • He could eat fewer foods and sauces that are high in sodium.
          • He could eat smaller portions.
          • He could read Nutrition Facts labels to make sure he eats foods that are lower in calories, saturated and trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, and added sugar.
          • He could eat more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk products, and lactose-free products.
        • What else can Jose do to lose weight and lower his blood pressure?
          • Jose could get 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity every day.
          • He could dance or practice tai chi or yoga while he watches television.
          • He could watch less television and walk or bike to a park, library, or fresh foods market.
          • He could take his high blood pressure medicine as his doctor instructs.
        • Ask the following questions:
          • What are some of the lessons we learned from these scenarios?
          • Is there any part of a scenario that is similar to your own life?
  6. Ampalaya (Bitter Melon) With Pork Recipe
    Note: This activity will give group members a chance to try heart healthy recipes at home.
    • Give group members the “Ampalaya (Bitter Melon) With Pork Recipe” handout.
    • Say:
      This dish contains lean meat and vegetables. It is also seasoned with herbs and spices. Try to prepare this at home this week.
  7. Cooking With Children
    • Give group members the “Cooking With Children” and “Cantaloupe Crush Recipe for Children” handouts.
    • Ask volunteers to read the “Cooking With Children” handout out loud.
    • Say:
      If you are parents, you can teach your children healthy eating habits. Lola says often, “Ang gawa sa pagkabata, dala hanggang pagtanda.” “What one learns in childhood is carried into adulthood.”
    • Say:
      For good health and proper growth, children need to eat a variety of different foods every day. If children are provided a balanced diet, they will develop good eating habits.
    • Say:
      The cantaloupe crush is a drink made from fresh fruit and milk. Children love this drink, especially on hot, summer days.
    • Ask:
      Can you think of other ways to get children involved in helping to prepare healthy meals?
    • Write group members’ suggestions on the blackboard or on a large piece of paper taped to the wall.

      More Information

      We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity and Nutrition) is an education program to help children ages 8 to 13 maintain a healthy weight. The program includes tips for parents on healthy food choices and physical activity. Visit http://wecan.nhlbi.nih.gov.

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Review of Today's Key Points

  • Say:
    Let’s review what we learned today.
  • Ask:
  • What is heart healthy about the traditional Filipino diet?
    • The traditional Filipino diet provides a variety of foods that are lower in fat and sodium, such as steamed rice, bread, noodles, vegetables, fruits, lean meat, poultry, fish and seafood, low-fat and fat-free milk and milk products.
  • What are some foods that we should eat less often?
    • We should limit foods that are high in saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, sugar, and calories, including:
      • Foods high in fat, such as longanisa (native sausage), fried lumpia (egg roll), sinangag (garlic fried rice), fried meat and vegetables, fatty meats, canned and processed meat, high-fat cheeses and creams, and banana chips
      • Foods high in sodium, such as chips, canned meat and fish, and sauces and seasonings, such as patis (fish sauce), bagoong (salted fish or shrimp paste), pusit (dried, salty squid), vetsin or monosodium glutamate, and soy sauce
      • Foods high in added sugar, such as candy and soft drinks
      • Foods high in fat and added sugar, such as halo-halo, bibingka (cake with coconut milk and butter), pastries, cookies, and chocolate
  • How can the heart healthy eating plan be used to choose heart healthy foods?
    • Use the heart healthy eating plan to choose foods that are lower in saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, and sugar from each of the five food groups. The eating plan also shows the number of servings you need from each group every day.
  • Why is it helpful to know how much you need to eat from each food group each day?
    • When you know the amount of food you need to eat every day, it can help you get the right amount of calories you need.

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Lola's Life Lessons: A Time To Reflect

  • Say:
    In the last session, Lola Idad spoke to us about having the courage to be fearless. This week, Lola promotes heart health in our families by encouraging us to support each other in our efforts.
  • Give each group member the “Lola’s Life Lessons: Session 8” handout. Ask a volunteer to read the handout.
  • Say:
    Please take a few moments to reflect on Lola’s advice and how this applies to your life. At the bottom of the handout, there is a space called “A Time To Reflect.” Use this section to record your feelings about this week’s session. Please write down your thoughts. Remember, this is for you and no one else.
  • Give each group member 2 to 3 minutes to write down some thoughts.

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Pledge for Life!

  • Give each group member the “Pledge for Life! Session 8” handout.
  • Say:
    Take the pledge for life with Lola and her family. Pledge to do one thing on this list during the coming week. Now, let’s start by sharing our goals with each other.
    Note: Tell group members to be very specific about what they plan to do. (For example, if they say they will eat smaller portions, ask them to name some ways they can do this.)
  • Give each group member 2 to 3 minutes to share.

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Closing

  • Say:
    Thank you for coming today. What did you think of today’s session?
    Note: Allow a moment for group members to respond.
  • Say:
    I am looking forward to seeing you again at the next session. We will talk about eating in a heart healthy way–even when time or money is tight.
    Note: Think about today’s session. What worked and what didn’t work? Have you made healthy changes in your food choices that were covered in today’s session?

Go to Session 7

Go to Session 9


Information on this page is taken from the English print version of “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family: A Community Health Worker's Manual.” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, NIH Publication No. 08-3674, Originally Printed 1999, Revised May 2008.




Last Updated March 2012




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