Healthy Heart, Healthy Family: A Community Health Worker's Manual for the Filipino Community

Manual Contents

Introduction

Page Contents

The Role of the Community Health Worker

Community health workers play a key role in promoting better health in Filipino American communities. They help people learn about health issues and show them ways to live healthier lives. Without them, many Filipino Americans might not receive such vital information.

Successful community health workers have special qualities. They know their communities well. They are dedicated to improving the health of their communities. They enjoy teaching others, feel comfortable in front of a group, and know how to work with a group. They are also:

  • Good listeners
  • Nonjudgmental
  • Caring
  • Pleasant
  • Patient
  • Approachable
  • Fair
  • Openminded
  • Helpful
  • Confident
  • Willing to try new ways to improve their own health

Let's Hear From You!

We thank you for your interest and efforts to help Filipino Americans take steps to protect their hearts. We invite you to give us your feedback on how you are using the manual in your community.

Your feedback will help promote the expansion of the project in the United States and abroad and contribute to the growth of the Healthy Heart, Healthy Family network. Establishing a large network is important to keep the project going strong!

You may also send your feedback to:

Healthy Heart, Healthy Family Project
NHLBI Division for the Application of Research Discoveries
Building 31, Room 4A10
31 Center Drive, MSC 2480
Bethesda, MD 20892-2480
woov@mail.nih.gov

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Acknowledgments

The “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family” manual was developed with the dedication of many people. NHLBI gratefully acknowledges the contributions of community health workers, families, groups, institutions, and organizations to the success of this manual. We appreciate the time they dedicated to reviewing the manual, sharing their knowledge, and providing continuous support:

  • Noilyn Abesamis-Mendoza, M.P.H.
    Center for the Study of Asian American Health
    New York University School of Medicine
    New York, NY
    Also representing:
    Kalusugan Coalition, Inc.
    Queens, NY, and Jersey City, NJ
  • Nina Agbayani, R.N.
    Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO)
    Oakland, CA
  • David Aguilar, M.A.
    Project AsPIRE
    Center for the Study of Asian American Health
    New York University School of Medicine
    New York, NY
    Also representing:
    Kalusugan Coalition, Inc.
    Queens, NY, and Jersey City, NJ
  • Sharonne Ancheta
    Kokua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services
    Honolulu, HI
  • Marcia Aquino, R.N.
    Association of Philippine Physicians in Maryland (APPM)
    Baltimore, MD
  • Gloria Balaiz
    Kokua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services
    Honolulu, HI
  • Norma Benzon
    Volunteer
    Sugar Land, TX
  • Michael Byun, M.P.A.
    Asian Service in Action
    Akron, OH
  • Sefie Cabiao
    International Community Health Services
    Seattle, WA
  • Yoyie Carlos-Castillo, R.N.
    Volunteer
    Hasbrouck Heights, NJ
  • Norma Castillo, M.D.
    Association of Philippine Physicians in Maryland (APPM)
    Baltimore, MD
  • Hong Chartrand, M.P.A., M.A.
    Asian Pacific Community in Action
    Phoenix, AZ
  • Merlita Compton
    Kokua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services
    Honolulu, HI
  • Ofelia Dirige, Dr.P.H., R.D.
    Kalusugan Community Services
    National City, CA
  • Chin Du, M.P.H., M.Ed.
    Health Promotion Council of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Inc.
    Philadelphia, PA
  • Lien Du
    Vietnamese Association of Illinois
    Chicago, IL
  • Diep N. Duong, R.N., Ph.D.
    Lt. Col., USAF, NC
    HQ PACAF/XPH
    Pacific International Health Affairs
    South East Asia Desk (Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Viet Nam)
    Hickam AFB, HI
  • Rico Foz
    Project AsPIRE
    Center for the Study of Asian American Health
    New York University School of Medicine
    New York, NY
    Also representing:
    Kalusugan Coalition, Inc.
    Queens, NY, and Jersey City, NJ
  • Purificacion Gac, M.D.
    Volunteer
    Honolulu, HI
  • Jesus Guarin
    Kokua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services
    Honolulu, HI
  • Beverly J. Quan Gor, Ed.D., R.D., L.D., C.D.E.
    Center for Research on Minority Health
    University of Texas
    M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
    Houston, TX
  • John Paul Jael
    Asian Human Services
    Chicago, IL
  • Edwin Jocson
    West Bay Filipino Multi-Service Center
    San Francisco, CA
  • Miyong T. Kim, R.N., Ph.D., FAAN
    School of Nursing
    Johns Hopkins University
    Baltimore, MD
  • Tana M. Le
    West Seventh Community Center, Inc.
    St. Paul, MN
  • Marichu Lee
    Volunteer
    Honolulu, HI
  • Harvey Lee
    Institute for Family Enrichment
    Honolulu, HI
  • Donna R. Lew
    American Heart Association
    San Francisco, CA
  • Maria Macatumbas
    Kokua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services
    Honolulu, HI
  • Potri R. Manis, R.N.
    Project AsPIRE
    Kalusugan Coalition, Inc.
    Queens, NY, and Jersey City, NJ
  • Carmen Lavilla-Cortez, Ph.D.
    Kalusugan Coalition, Inc.
    Queens, NY, and Jersey City, NJ
  • Estrella B. Manio, M.S., R.N., P.N.P.
    Chair, Filipino Community Health Council
    American Heart Association
    San Francisco, CA
  • Melen McBride, R.N., Ph.D.
    Stanford Geriatric Education Center
    Center for Education in Family and Community Medicine
    Stanford University School of Medicine
    Palo Alto, CA
  • Mary Cheryl B. Nacionales, M.P.H., CHES
    Women’s Health Partnership Director
    Community Health Partnership
    San Jose, CA
  • Vilma Nafarrete-Braga, L.M.S.W.
    Filipino American Human Services, Inc.
    Jamaica, NY
  • Phi-Loan Nguyen
    Boat People SOS
    Washington, DC
  • Phi-Nhung (Nina) Nguyen
    Boat People SOS
    Washington, DC
  • Thang D. Nguyen, Ph.D.
    Boat People SOS
    Falls Church, VA
  • Thoa Nguyen
    Vietnamese Community Health Promotion Project – UCSF
    Health is Gold!
    San Francisco, CA
  • Mario Oliveros
    Volunteer
    Santa Clara, CA
  • Leo Pandac, Ph.D.
    Pacific Asian Alcohol and Drug Program
    Los Angeles County Refugee Service Center
    Los Angeles, CA
  • Dung Pham
    Vietnamese Social Services of Minnesota (VSSMN)
    Vietnam Center
    St. Paul, MN
  • Melga R. Rodriguez, M.A.Ed.
    Department of Public Health
    City and County of San Francisco
    Bicol University
    Legazpi City, Philippines
  • Teodulfo V. Rodriguez
    Volunteer
    Baypoint, CA
  • La Sarmiento, L.M.T.
    Volunteer
    Washington, DC
  • Fe Seligman
    Operation Samahan Health Clinic
    National City, CA
  • Henry Soliveres
    Project AsPIRE
    Center for the Study of Asian American Health
    New York University School of Medicine
    New York, NY
    Also representing:
    Kalusugan Coalition, Inc.
    Queens, NY, and Jersey City, NJ
  • Ho L. Tran, M.D., M.P.H.
    Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF)
    San Francisco, CA
  • Rhodora Ursua, M.P.H.
    Project AsPIRE
    Center for the Study of Asian American Health
    New York University School of Medicine
    New York, NY
    Also representing:
    Kalusugan Coalition, Inc.
    Queens, NY, and Jersey City, NJ
  • Mila Velasquez, M.N., R.N., C.S., APRN, BC
    Philippine Nurses Association of America
    Cerritos, CA
  • Dia Kim Vu
    Vietnamese Social Services of Minnesota (VSSMN)
    St. Paul, MN
  • Candice Wong, M.D., Ph.D.
    University of California, San Francisco
    Department of Physiological Nursing
    San Francisco, CA
  • Jing Zhang, Ph.D.
    Asian Human Services, Inc.
    Chicago, IL

Special Recognition

NHLBI extends special recognition to the following individuals and organizations for assisting NHLBI in helping make the material culturally appropriate and for sampling selected sessions and/or activities of the manual with the community:

  • Theresa P. Castillo, M.A., CHES
    Public Health Fellow
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Emerging Leaders Program
    Bethesda, MD
  • Center for the Study of Asian American Health
    New York University School of Medicine
    New York, NY
  • American Heart Association
    Asian Cultural Health Initiatives
    San Francisco, CA
  • Kalusugan Coalition, Inc.
    Queens, NY, and Jersey City, NJ

May the “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family” manual lead to a new cycle of action to strengthen and sustain heart health in the Filipino American communities.

NHLBI Staff

  • Matilde Alvarado, R.N., M.S.N.
    Coordinator
    Minority Health Education and Outreach Activities
    Division for the Application of Research Discoveries
    Bethesda, MD
  • Janet de Jesus, M.S., R.D.
    Nutrition Education Specialist
    Division for the Application of Research Discoveries
    Bethesda, MD
  • Robinson Fulwood, Ph.D., M.S.P.H.
    Chief
    Enhanced Dissemination and Utilization Branch
    Division for the Application of Research Discoveries
    Bethesda, MD
  • Madeleine Wallace, Ph.D.
    Public Health Analyst
    Division for the Application of Research Discoveries
    Bethesda, MD
  • Terri Williams, M.S.A.
    Production Manager
    Division for the Application of Research Discoveries
    Bethesda, MD
  • Violet Ryo-Hwa Woo, M.S., M.P.H.
    Public Health Advisor
    Division for the Application of Research Discoveries
    Bethesda, MD

Contract Support

IQ Solutions, Inc.
Rockville, MD

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About the “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family” Manual

To teach the “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family” sessions, the following materials are needed:

  • “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family” manual and picture cards
  • “Filipinos Take It to Heart: A ‘How-To’ Guide for Bringing Heart Health to Your Community” highlights steps that can be taken to implement successful awareness-raising and health-promoting activities in the community to prevent and control cardiovascular risk factors.
  • Six easy-to-read bilingual booklets on heart healthy living:
    • Are You at Risk for Heart Disease?
    • Help Your Heart: Control Your High Blood Pressure
    • Keep the Beat: Aim for a Healthy Weight
    • Be Heart Smart: Keep Your Cholesterol in Check
    • Protect Your Heart: Prevent and Control Diabetes
    • Be Heart Healthy: Enjoy Living Smoke Free

Ordering information for these materials appears in the Appendix.

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How To Use This Manual

Community Health Workers, this manual is for you! The “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family” manual can be used to train community health workers. After you've been trained, you can conduct your own trainings and teach others how to be community health workers.

The “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family” manual consists of 12 sessions that include step-by-step instructions on how to teach 11 fun and educational sessions to community residents or patients. Each Session is taught in motivational and interactive ways to keep the attention of the group members. Each session helps people learn about what they can do to prevent heart disease. The manual includes worksheets and handouts for project participants (group members) to take home to read and share with their family and friends.

It also includes a special session for community health workers on how to evaluate completed projects. This session helps community health workers determine how successful they have been in implementing their training and educational activities and helping community residents adopt heart healthy habits. The Appendix features special training activities and teaching tips and explains how to start a project in their own communities.

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“Healthy heart, Healthy Family” Sessions

  1. Knowledge Is Power: Know Your Risk for Heart Disease
  2. Act in Time to Heart Attack Signs
  3. Get Energized! Say YES to Physical Activity
  4. Help Your Heart: Control Your High Blood Pressure
  5. Be Heart Smart: Keep Your Cholesterol in Check
  6. Keep the Beat: Aim for a Healthy Weight
  7. Protect Your Heart: Prevent and Control Diabetes
  8. Welcome Heart Healthy Eating Into Your Home
  9. Eat in a Heart Healthy Way—Even When Time or Money Is Tight
  10. Take Control of Your Health: Enjoy Living Smoke Free
  11. Review and Graduation
  12. Use Evaluation To Track Your Progress (Especially for Community Health Workers)

Session Outline

Each session begins with a summary page that explains:

  • What you want group members to do or learn
  • Materials and supplies that you will need
  • Worksheets and materials that you will hand out
  • The session outline

Each session also includes five major parts:

  • Part 1 – Introducing the Session
    • Welcome the group members.
    • Review the information from the last session.
    • Ask the group members to talk about their pledges.
    • Explain what you will talk about in today's session.
  • Part 2 – Conducting the Session
    • Present new information.
    • Lead the group in fun and educational activities.
    • Ask the group members questions.
    • Let the group members ask questions about what they have heard.
  • Part 3 – Review of Today's Key Points
    • Ask questions to help the group members review what they just learned.
    • Emphasize the important points.
  • Part 4 – Lola's Life Lessons: A Time To Reflect
    • Lola shares her wisdom and the heart health changes she made to her lifestyle behavior.
    • She shares how she inspired heart health changes in her family and friends.
  • Part 5 – Weekly Pledge
    • Help group members come up with a pledge to make a healthy lifestyle change that relates to the information they have learned during the session.
    • Give several examples of pledges that are specific and realistic.
    • Share the personal value. The value helps encourage participants to keep their pledges and gain confidence so they can make lasting lifestyle changes.
  • Part 6 – Closing
    • Tell the group members that you enjoyed the session, and wish them luck in meeting their pledges.
    • Thank the group members for attending the session.
    • Ask the group members what they thought of the session.

Symbols

Symbols are used throughout the manual to let you know quickly what comes next:

  • Do an activity.
  • Use a picture card.
  • Give out a handout.
  • Help group members create a pledge for heart health.
  • Give out a recipe.
  • Do a training activity.

Picture Cards

The “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family” picture cards can be used with the manual to help you present information for each session. When you see the picture card symbol in the manual, you will know to show a picture that relates to the information you will be talking about. On the back of each picture card is a script in English and Tagalog that you can read aloud while you show the picture card.

Breaks and Refreshments

You should take a short break about halfway through each session. You may want to use the time to do some easy stretches. Another option is to serve a small healthy snack with water during the break. Snack ideas include light yogurt or fruit, or vegetables with low-fat dip and water. Or you can make one of the recipes from this manual and have group members taste it.

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Getting Started

At Least 6 Weeks in Advance

  1. Find a location. Find a place to teach the “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family” sessions in your area that people can get to easily. Call local clinics, schools, churches, and community centers. Reserve a room for a time when community members can attend.
  2. Tell people about the project. Let community leaders and others know that you are offering the course. Ask clinic personnel, clergy, and caseworkers to recommend it.
    • Say:
      These are some of the benefits of the course:
      • The course can help participants and their families find out their own risk for heart disease and learn how to lead healthier lives.
      • Participants will learn low-cost cooking techniques as well as how to eat healthy foods, prevent heart disease, become more physically active, keep a healthy weight, take care of diabetes, and quit smoking.
      • The course is also for participants who have risk factors for heart disease or are under the care of a doctor because of heart disease. This course will guide participants to take steps to protect and improve their heart health.
      • Participants will learn that, whatever your age or current health status, it is never too late to take steps to protect your heart.
  3. Advertise the sessions. Post flyers at health fairs and in community sites, such as clinics, grocery stores, churches, and other places in your community. (sample flyer) Place course announcements in local media outlets.
  4. Class size. A small group of about 10 to 12 people is best. Try to get about 20 people to sign up, because some may not show up for the class, and others may drop out.

At Least 1 Week Before Each Session

  1. Read through the sessions, picture cards, and handouts. Read through these materials two or three times to be prepared.
  2. Carefully read the information that you will present to the group members. Practice what you will say in front of a mirror or to a friend or family member. Be sure to use the picture cards. Also practice making a few healthy changes in your own life.
  3. Review the instructions for each activity. Make a list of things you need to do before the session, such as making a food display or getting a VCR and TV monitor. For some sessions, you will need to create lists of places where people can get their blood pressure, blood glucose (test for diabetes), or blood cholesterol checked.
  4. Pay attention to the “More Information” boxes. This extra information will help you answer questions from the group.
  5. Ask a health educator, registered dietitian, nurse, or doctor to explain any information you do not understand. Contact these health professionals at your local hospital or neighborhood clinic.
  6. Review the list of handouts, materials, and supplies you will need for each session.
    • Make enough copies of the handouts for all group members.
    • Gather all the materials and supplies needed to conduct the session.

The Day of the Session

  1. Review the list of materials, supplies, and handouts. Make sure that you have everything.
  2. Arrive 30 to 60 minutes ahead of time. This will allow you to set up the room, VCR, and TV monitor.
  3. Tell group members when sessions will meet and how often.

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Working With Your Group

Leading the Group

  • Get to know the members of your group. They may have different backgrounds, interests, and needs.
  • Use words and terms that are familiar to the people in your group.
  • Encourage group members to ask questions. Asking questions helps group members apply the information to their own lives and remember what they have learned.
  • Keep the sessions flowing smoothly so everyone is interested and involved.
    • Be ready to deal with people who talk too much. Thank these people for sharing their opinions. Then quickly ask if anyone else has something to share.
    • Help members who do not read or write well in a way that will not bring attention to them.
    • Offer help, but do not force anyone to accept help.
    • Change the activity to a group discussion.
  • Be observant. Watch for clues from group members who do not understand and try to give the information in a different way if you see these clues:
    • Puzzled looks
    • Wrinkled foreheads
    • Looking away from you
    • Being quiet

Motivating Group Members

  • Praise or reward group members' efforts in order to keep them motivated.
    • Give praise when it is deserved. This gives more meaning to what you are teaching.
    • Praise people in front of others. This can help them stay committed.
  • Encourage group members to share their opinions.
    • Show interest in group members and what they have to say.
    • Be patient. Some people may not speak because they have never been asked to share their opinions in a group setting.
    • Try to involve everyone in the discussion and activities, but do not force anyone to speak. People will speak up when they become used to the group.
  • Encourage participants to take small steps toward change.
    • People are more likely to develop new habits if you promote small changes slowly. This brings more success.

Getting People to Come

  • Remind the group members that it is important to come to all the sessions. Tell them that they will:
    • Learn something new at each session.
    • Help family members.
    • Socialize and meet people.
  • Ask people to team up and call one another as a reminder to attend the sessions. This encourages people to attend.
  • Remind them of the meeting time and how long the sessions will last.

Answering Hard Questions

Remember that it's okay not to know all the answers! Say that you will have the correct answer by the next session. Call a local health educator, registered dietitian, or nurse to find out the correct information.

Keeping People on Track

Give the group the correct information when a group member gives incorrect or incomplete information. Give the person credit for any part of his or her answer that is correct. Say that people often hear incorrect information and believe it to be true. Tell the group members that this is one important reason why they are taking the course—to get correct information.

And Finally…

Have a good time. You are doing an important service for yourself and your community. Thank you!

Go to Overview

Go to Session 1


Information on this page is taken from the English print version of “Healthy Heart, Healthy Family: A Community Health Worker's Manual.” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, NIH Publication No. 08-3674, Originally Printed 1999, Revised May 2008.




Last Updated March 2012




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