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What To Expect Before Cardiac MRI

You'll be asked to fill out a screening form before having cardiac MRI. The form may ask whether you've had any previous surgeries. It also may ask whether you have any metal objects or medical devices (like a cardiac pacemaker) in your body.

Some implanted medical devices, such as man-made heart valves and coronary stents, are safe around the MRI machine, but others are not. For example, the MRI machine can:

  • Cause implanted cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators to malfunction.
  • Damage cochlear (inner-ear) implants. Cochlear implants are small, electronic devices that help people who are deaf or who can't hear well understand speech and the sounds around them.
  • Cause brain aneurysm (AN-u-rism) clips to move as a result of the MRI's strong magnetic field. This can cause severe injury.

Talk to your doctor or the MRI technician if you have concerns about any implanted devices that may interfere with the MRI. 

Your doctor will let you know if you shouldn't have a cardiac MRI because of a medical device. If so, consider wearing a medical ID bracelet or necklace or carrying a medical alert card that states that you shouldn't have an MRI.

If you're pregnant, make sure your doctor knows before you have an MRI. No harmful effects of MRI during pregnancy have been reported; however, more research on the safety of MRI during pregnancy is needed.

Your doctor or technician will tell you whether you need to change into a hospital gown for the test. Don't bring hearing aids, credit cards, jewelry and watches, eyeglasses, pens, removable dental work, or anything that's magnetic near the MRI machine.

Tell your doctor if being in a fairly tight or confined space causes you anxiety or fear. If so, your doctor might give you medicine to help you relax. Your doctor may ask you to fast (not eat) for 6 hours before you take this medicine on the day of the test.

Some newer cardiac MRI machines are open on all sides. If you're fearful in tight or confined spaces, ask your doctor to help you find a facility that has an open MRI machine.

Your doctor will let you know whether you need to arrange for a ride home after the test.

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Cardiac MRI Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. To find clinical trials that are currently underway for Cardiac MRI, visit www.clinicaltrials.gov.

 
February 02, 2012 Last Updated Icon

The NHLBI updates Health Topics articles on a biennial cycle based on a thorough review of research findings and new literature. The articles also are updated as needed if important new research is published. The date on each Health Topics article reflects when the content was originally posted or last revised.