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Other Names for Cardiomyopathy

Other Names for Dilated Cardiomyopathy

  • Alcoholic cardiomyopathy. This term is used when overuse of alcohol causes the disease.
  • Congestive cardiomyopathy.
  • Diabetic cardiomyopathy.
  • Familial dilated cardiomyopathy.
  • Idiopathic cardiomyopathy.
  • Ischemic cardiomyopathy. This term is used when coronary heart disease (also called coronary artery disease) or heart attack causes the disease.
  • Peripartum cardiomyopathy. This term is used when the disease develops in a woman shortly before or after she gives birth.
  • Primary cardiomyopathy.

Other Names for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

  • Asymmetric septal hypertrophy
  • Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
  • Hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy
  • Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy
  • Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis

Other Names for Restrictive Cardiomyopathy

  • Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy
  • Infiltrative cardiomyopathy

Other Names for Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia

  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy
  • Right ventricular cardiomyopathy
  • Right ventricular dysplasia
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Cardiomyopathy Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. To find clinical trials that are currently underway for Cardiomyopathy, visit www.clinicaltrials.gov.


Cardiomyopathy in the News

September 3, 2013
Risk factors identified at diagnosis help predict outcomes for children with rare heart condition
A long-term study of children with a complex heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) found that risk factors identified at diagnosis help to predict outcomes for children with this rare condition.

View all Cardiomyopathy Press Releases


 
January 01, 2011 Last Updated Icon

The NHLBI updates Health Topics articles on a biennial cycle based on a thorough review of research findings and new literature. The articles also are updated as needed if important new research is published. The date on each Health Topics article reflects when the content was originally posted or last revised.