Accessible Search Form           Advanced Search

Español

The Heart Truth - Campaign Materials
Campaign Materials

The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women

Plan Ahead

Nobody plans on having a heart attack. But just as many people have a plan in case of fire, it is important to develop a plan to deal with a possible heart attack. Taking the following steps can preserve your health—and your life:

  • Learn the heart attack warning signs by heart.

  • Talk with family and friends about the warning signs and the need to call 9-1-1 quickly.

  • Talk with your health care provider about your risk factors for heart attack and how to reduce them.

  • Write out a heart attack survival plan that has vital medical information and keep it handy. (Use the accompanying box below as a guide.)

  • Arrange in advance to have someone care for your children or other dependents in an emergency.

If you think you, or someone else, may be having a heart attack, you must act quickly to prevent disability or death. Wait no more than a few minutes—5 at most—before dialing 9-1-1.


Fill out the form below and make several copies of it. Keep one copy near your home phone, another at work, and a third copy in your wallet or purse.
Printable form.

Information To Share With Emergency Medical
Personnel and Hospital Staff
Medicines you are taking:
 
 

Medicines you are allergic to:
 
 
How To Contact Your Doctor
If symptoms stop completely in less than 5 minutes, you should still
call your doctor right away.

Phone number during office hours:

Phone number after office hours:
Person To Contact If You Go to the Hospital
Name:

Home phone number:

Work phone number:

Cell phone number:
 
Table of Contents Next: The Heart of The Matter

Last Updated: February 29, 2012

The Heart Truth, its logo, The Red Dress, Red Dress, Red Dress Collection, and Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear—It's the #1 Killer of Women are registered trademarks of U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). 
National Wear Red Day is a registered trademark of HHS and the American Heart Association.

Twitter iconTwitterimage of external icon Facebook iconFacebookimage of external icon YouTube iconYouTubeimage of external icon Google+ iconGoogle+image of external icon