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The Red Dress
The Red Dress

The Red Dress

The Red Dress®, the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness, serves as a red alert for women-reminding them of The Heart Truth message: "Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear—It's the #1 Killer of Women." The Red Dress Pin is now available from WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, a partner of The Heart Truth.

The Red Dress®, centerpiece of The Heart Truth®, is a red alert that inspires women to take action to protect their heart health. The primary message driving The Heart Truth campaign is: "Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear—It's the #1 Killer of Women.®"

Why a Red Dress℠?

The Red Dress was designed to build awareness that women are at risk for heart disease and motivate them to take action to reduce their risk. As an icon, the Red Dress tested well with women across the country who cited its ability to get attention, convey the seriousness of heart disease, and change the perception that it is only a man's issue.

The Heart Truth introduced the Red Dress as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness at the campaign's launch in 2002.

National Wear Red Day®

National Wear Red Day® is a day of action to show support for women and heart disease awareness and promote the Red Dress as a national symbol. On the first Friday in February each year, women and men across the country can unite in the national movement to give women a personal and urgent wake up call about their risk of heart disease. Everyone can participate by showing off a favorite red dress, shirt, or tie, or by wearing The Red Dress Pin (now available from WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, a partner of The Heart Truth).

Learn more about National Wear Red Day.

Red Dress Collection

Seeking to advance the Red Dress symbol, The Heart Truth forged a groundbreaking collaboration between the Federal government and the fashion industry, an industry intrinsically tied to female audiences. As a result of this partnership, fashion leaders—including top designers, models, and celebrities—have demonstrated their support for the issue of women and heart disease by participating in The Heart Truth Red Dress Collection at New York Fashion Week annually since 2003.

The Heart Truth launched the first Red Dress Collection at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in February 2003, when 19 designers—from Vera Wang to Donna Karan to Oscar de la Renta—contributed red dresses for a stunning display under the Bryant Park tents. In February 2004, the fashion platform expanded with the creation of the first annual National Wear Red Day and the same–day debut of Red Dress Collection 2004—a fashion show featuring red dresses from the industry's elite designers worn by top fashion models and celebrities. The campaign has returned to center–stage to New York Fashion Week every February since its first show in 2003 with a celebrity–studded fashion show. Some of the world's most recognized stars have walked the runway for The Heart Truth in new collections of designer red dresses including: Toni Braxton, Roselyn Sánchez, Gabrielle Douglas, Jillian Michaels, Rebecca Romijn, Chaka Khan, Giselle Blondet, Felicity Huffman, Robin Roberts, Sheryl Crow, Kelly Ripa, Venus Williams, Angela Bassett, Rachael Ray, Christie Brinkley, Vanessa Williams, Billie Jean King, Duchess of York Sarah Ferguson, LeAnn Rimes, and Eartha Kitt.

To learn more about The Heart Truth Red Dress Collection Fashion Shows, visit Fashion Week or the Image Library for pictures from these events.

Last Updated: March 11, 2013

The Heart Truth, its logo, The Red Dress, and Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear—It's the #1 Killer of Women are registered trademarks of HHS.
Red Dress and Red Dress Collection are service marks of HHS.
National Wear Red Day is a registered trademark of HHS and AHA.

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