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The Heart Truth - Road Show
The Heart Truth - Road Show

Road Show

The 2010 Heart Truth Road Show, presented with support from partner Diet Coke, reached hundreds of individuals with life-saving messages about heart disease risk.

Overall, The Heart Truth® screened nearly 1,000 people for heart disease risk factors during the 2010 Road Show. Of the participants who completed the survey on their screening forms, 77 percent reported that they would take steps to improve their heart health following their participation in the Road Show; and 63 percent indicated that they would talk to a doctor about their risk factors for heart disease to improve their heart health. Further, in several cases where screening results warranted, the screenings prompted participants to go straight to the hospital for a check-up.

The Road Show exhibit and screenings were viewed as an extremely valuable resource: visitors repeatedly cited their employment status and lack of health care as the main draw that brought them by the exhibit. Many visitors who were screened later returned with their entire family.

Below are some personal anecdotes and observations from the two-city Road Show. Also, visit the road show photographs to view pictures of the exhibit.

  • After participating in the free screenings and learning that he was at risk for heart disease, one man then brought his entire family, including his mother, wife, and two daughters, to get tested and learn about how they could take steps to live a heart healthy life. (Albuquerque, NM)

  • Several overweight participants who went through the screenings and spoke with the cardiologist onsite expressed that the screenings helped encourage them to start exercising and walking now that they knew their numbers. While most knew they were overweight, they were surprised by their blood pressure/cholesterol results. (Albuquerque, NM)

  • One woman heard about the Road Show event in the news and fasted all day in preparation for the screening. She was extremely thankful for the screening and the opportunity to talk to a cardiologist. (Albuquerque, NM)

  • A nurse from the Texas Medical Center area stopped by and thanked The Heart Truth for coming out to the community saying how wonderful it was that the exhibit was offering this service for everyone, especially women. (Houston, TX)

  • A young Hispanic woman stopped by the exhibit and encouraged her elderly aunt to get screened. After going through the screening with her aunt and getting the results, it became clear that the young girl had a family history of heart disease risk factors. Later that evening, the young girl returned with her mother and grandmother to have them get screened. Then later in the weekend, she returned again with her husband and decided to go through the screening as well. This was truly a multi-generational example of the importance of knowing your family history and your family membersí risk factors. (Houston, TX)

  • An older Hispanic women brought her husband to get screened because she was very worried because he had been complaining of several headaches and was having daily nose bleeds. During the screenings, the nurses on-site found that his blood pressure and cholesterol were dangerously high and stressed that he must go to the hospital right away. The woman was so thankful for the screenings and promptly rushed her husband off to the hospital. (Houston, TX)

  • One teenage girl stopped by the exhibit with her mother who did not speak any English. The young girl shared that her mother had not been to the doctor in years because she always looks after the family, but not herself. It was wonderful to see this young girl taking action on her motherís behalf and encouraging her mother to get screened. (Houston, TX)

Last Updated: February 29, 2012

The Heart Truth, its logo, The Red Dress, and Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear—It's the #1 Killer of Women are registered trademarks of HHS.
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